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Barack Obama failed to give a straight answer when asked on a Meet The Press yesterday whether he had managed to quit smoking.

The United States, where cigarettes are responsible for one in five deaths and smoking costs tens of billions of dollars in health care, The President elect has been under pressure to set an example by giving up his reported two-decade-old habit. Hard to believe that he is able to play basketball as well.

Interviewer Tom Brokaw told Mr Obama he was ducking answering the question.

Noting that the White House was a no-smoking zone, Brokaw asked Mr Obama, “Have you stopped smoking?”

“I have,” Mr Obama replied, smiling broadly. “What I said was that there are times where I have fallen off the wagon.”

“Wait a minute,” Brokaw interjected, “that means you haven’t stopped.”

“Fair enough,” Mr Obama said. “What I would say is that I have done a terrific job under the circumstances of making myself much healthier. You will not see any violations of these rules in the White House.”

Mr Obama was often observed on the presidential campaign trail chewing Nicorette gum, which helps ease the craving for nicotine. He has tried several times to quit.

The 47-year-old president-elect, who takes office on January 20, works out daily at the gym and sometimes plays basketball. His doctor said in May he was in excellent health, often jogged three miles a day and was fit to serve as US president.

Regardless of whether you look to the president for your leadership on all things health related, if you haven’t thought about quitting smoking, well then maybe you should for the new year. What about Smoke Away?

The U.N. General Assembly has ordered Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to put an end to smoking at U.N. headquarters in New York, widely seen as a tobacco safe haven in an otherwise smoke-free metropolis. The assembly told Ban to implement a ban on smoking and on the sale of tobacco products inside the building, Enrique Yeves, spokesman for General Assembly President Miguel D’Escoto Brockmann, told reporters on Thursday.

 

He said the demand came in a nonbinding resolution passed unanimously by the 192 U.N. member states earlier this week. “It is up to the secretariat now … to decide what kind of realistic measures can be taken for this to be implemented,” Yeves told reporters. Word of the General Assembly’s anti-smoking resolution had yet to reach all corners of the 40-story building. In the U.N. Delegates Lounge, a cloud of cigarette smoke hovered over clusters of diplomats and U.N. staff puffing tobacco and sipping coffee. Several of them told Reuters they had not heard of the resolution but added that they doubted Ban would succeed.

 

Although the United Nations is headquartered in New York, a statewide smoking ban does not apply to the Manhattan compound because it is considered international territory. Ban’s predecessor Kofi Annan tried to ban smoking at the U.N. skyscraper in 2003. But his anti-smoking drive failed as many diplomats and U.N. staff simply ignored the “no smoking” signs that appeared throughout the building.

 

U.N. officials say that smoking in the 60-year-old skyscraper is discouraged but not officially banned. Other U.N. agencies in New York with offices outside the U.N. secretariat building have successfully banned smoking on their premises. The top envoy from Britain, which co-sponsored the General Assembly resolution, welcomed the new anti-smoking drive. “I think as part of our effort to modernize the U.N., it’s important that the United Nations keeps up with the standards in the rest of the world,” Ambassador John Sawers told Reuters.

 “Smoking has been banned in the United Nations in Geneva,” he said. “We look forward to doing the same here in New York.” The key is that the genesis of stopping smoking on the largest of stages and scales needs to begin at the UN and New York and then it needs to trickle down to the smallest of places so that everyone understands how important it is that they stop or quit smoking or realize that they should have never started. Smoke Away realizes this and wants you too as well.

We spend an inordinate amount of time telling people, no, pleading with people to quit smoking either with the help of Smoke Away or without. The point being that is important for smokers to realize that quitting smoking is the name of the game because it kills you and it hurts others. With that in mind here are 11 thoughts and facts about second hand smoke you probably did not know,

  • Secondhand smoke has been classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a known cause of cancer in humans (Group A carcinogen).
  • Secondhand smoke exposure causes disease and premature death in children and adults who do not smoke. Secondhand smoke contains hundreds of chemicals known to be toxic or carcinogenic, including formaldehyde, benzene, vinyl chloride, arsenic ammonia and hydrogen cyanide.
  • Secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,400 lung cancer deaths and 22,700-69,600 heart disease deaths in adult nonsmokers in the United States each year.
  • Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke at work are at increased risk for adverse health effects. Levels of secondhand smoke in restaurants and bars were found to be 2 to 5 times higher than in residences with smokers and 2 to 6 times higher than in office workplaces.
  • Since 1999, 70 percent of the U.S. workforce worked under a smoke-free policy, ranging from 83.9 percent in Utah to 48.7 percent in Nevada.  Workplace productivity was increased and absenteeism was decreased among former smokers compared with current smokers.
  • Eighteen states – Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington and Vermont – as well as the District of Columbia prohibit smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. Montana and Utah prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants; bars will go smokefree in 2009. New Hampshire prohibits smoking in some public places, including all restaurants and bars. Four states – Florida, Idaho, Louisiana and Nevada – prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants, but exempt stand-alone bars. Fifteen states partially or totally prevent (preempt) local communities from passing smokefree air ordinances stronger than the statewide law. Iowa, Nebraska and Oregon have passed legislation prohibiting smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars, but the laws have not taken effect yet.
  • Secondhand smoke is especially harmful to young children. Secondhand smoke is responsible for between 150,000 and 300,000 lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children under 18 months of age, resulting in between 7,500 and 15,000 hospitalizations each year, and causes 430 sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) deaths in the United States annually.
  • Secondhand smoke exposure may cause buildup of fluid in the middle ear, resulting in 790,000 physician office visits per year.  Secondhand smoke can also aggravate symptoms in 400,000 to 1,000,000 children with asthma.
  • In the United States, 21 million, or 35 percent of, children live in homes where residents or visitors smoke in the home on a regular basis. Approximately 50-75 percent of children in the United States have detectable levels of cotinine, the breakdown product of nicotine in the blood.
  • Research indicates that private research conducted by cigarette company Philip Morris in the 1980s showed that secondhand smoke was highly toxic, yet the company suppressed the finding during the next two decades.
  • The current Surgeon General’s Report concluded that scientific evidence indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Short exposures to secondhand smoke can cause blood platelets to become stickier, damage the lining of blood vessels, decrease coronary flow velocity reserves, and reduce heart rate variability, potentially increasing the risk of heart attack.
  • From the department of the obvious we have the following: Young women who smoke are twice as likely to have a stroke as their nonsmoking peers, according to a new study. And the more cigarettes a woman smokes per day, the bigger her risk.

    The study was published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers, who studied women ages 15 to 49, found that women who smoke one to 10 cigarettes per day increase their stroke risk 2.2 times. Women who smoke 11 to 20 cigarettes per day increase stroke risk 2.5 times, while those who smoke 21 to 39 per day increase stroke risk more than fourfold. The heaviest smokers — those who smoke 40 or more cigarettes per day — increase their risk 9.1 times.

    The study followed 466 women who had suffered their first strokes. A comparison group consisted of 604 women of similar age, race, and ethnicity who had not had a stroke. A detailed smoking history was obtained during face-to-face interviews. Women were classified according to their smoking status as never-smokers, former smokers, or current smokers.

    “Our study adds strong evidence that cutting down helps reduce stroke risk, but quitting is unquestionably the best option,” researcher John Cole, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, says in a news release.

    In 2005, an estimated 21% of American women aged 18-44 were cigarette smokers, according to researchers. The good news is that when women stop smoking, their risk of having a stroke decreases. Stroke risk decreases significantly three years after smoking stops. After five years of being smoke-free, former smokers have the same risk of stroke as never-smokers. And the earlier that smokers quit, the better. People who quit smoking prior to age 35 can have the same life expectancy as those who have never smoked.

    The researchers point out that media campaigns and high prices for tobacco products help curb smoking rates among young people. “Our study supports the need to target smoking as a preventable and modifiable risk factor for cerebrovascular disease in young women,” they write.

    Smoke Away implores all that are merely thinking of quitting smoking, to quit smoking today, either with our product or not!

    A key mechanism by which smoking triggers genetic changes that cause lung cancer has been unravelled.

    Researchers have shown exposure to cigarette smoke slows production of a protein called FANCD2 in lung cells.

    This protein plays a key role in repairing damage to DNA, and causing faulty cells to commit suicide before they go on to become cancerous.

    The study, led by Oregon Health and Science University, appears in the British Journal of Cancer.

    LUNG CANCER
    Most common cancer in the world with 1.3 million people diagnosed every year
    Second most common form of cancer in the UK after breast cancer
    Over 38,300 new cases, and more than 33,000 deaths in the UK each year
    Smoking responsible for 90% of cases in the UK

    It raises hopes of improved treatments for the disease.

    Lead researcher Dr Laura Hays said: “These findings show the important role FANCD2 plays in protecting lung cells against cigarette smoke and may explain why cigarette smoke is so toxic to these cells.”

    The researchers suspect other proteins also play a role in fixing DNA and weeding out defective cells.

    However, their work showed that cells with very high levels of FANCD2 were resistant to the toxic effects of smoke – suggesting this protein is key.

    Artificial windpipe

    The researchers created an artificial windpipe in the lab to replicate the environment of a smoker’s lung.

    They then studied the effects of cigarette smoke on different proteins in cells and found that FANCD2 levels were low enough to allow DNA damage.

    FANCD2 is part of a family of proteins involved in an inherited condition called Fanconi anaemia.

    People with the condition are more likely to develop cancers at a young age and have low levels of these proteins.

    Dr Lesley Walker, director of cancer information at Cancer Research UK, said: “This interesting piece of science adds to our understanding of why smoking is so deadly.

    “Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer and causes nine out of ten cases of lung cancer.

    “But the good news is that quitting works – after five years without smoking your risk of a heart attack will have fallen to half that of a smoker.

    “And after ten years your risk of lung cancer will have halved too.”

    So quit smoking! Why not quit smoking? What are the triggers that are causing you to continue to smoke? If we can ID those triggers, then the makers of Smoke Away believe that you’re well on your way to heading down the path of a successful quit. Check in with our users over at Smoke Away Support for even more tips and advice on how to quit smoking, whether you use our product or not. Just quit.

    Childhood cancer survivors who are most likely to develop tumours as adults continue to endanger their health by smoking, research suggests.

    A University of Birmingham(England) team found the highest smoking rates among patients whose type of treatment put them at greater risk later in life.

    Cancer campaigners have expressed concern that the survivors are exposing themselves to “avoidable” dangers.

    The researchers say more education is needed about the risks of smoking.

    We are very concerned that people are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer
    Professor Mike Hawkins
    Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies

    The study, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, pinpoints three types of childhood cancer – Hodgkin’s lymphoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Wilms’ tumour – which are known to carry an increased risk of further tumours due to the form of radiotherapy and chemotherapy used to treat them.

    The researchers found that smoking was most common among people who had been treated for these cancers when children – nearly a quarter of the 10,000 former cancer sufferers surveyed.

    Overall, childhood cancer survivors are around half as likely as the general population to be regular smokers.

    Intervention call

    Researcher Dr Clare Frobisher, based at Birmingham’s Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “It is worrying that those survivors who are most at risk of developing a new cancer as a result of their treatment, are more likely to be smokers than other childhood cancer survivors.

    INCREASED RISK
    A study of 16,541 survivors of childhood cancer found they were 6.2 times more likely to develop a second primary tumour than the general population
    After 25 years 4.2% of survivors had developed a second primary cancer
    The rate of second primary tumours among survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma was 9.2 times that of the general population, for Wilms’ tumour it was 6.9 times, and for soft tissue sarcoma it was 4.3 times
    Figures from the Centre for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies

    “It is clear that more work needs to be done to make sure they are aware of their increased risk of a second cancer and other related health problems if they smoke.”

    The majority of smokers in the study took up smoking before the age of 20.

    Dr Frobisher said: “We think intervention programmes should be put in place early, targeting cancer survivors as young as 12.”

    Professor Mike Hawkins, director of the Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “We are very concerned that people who have been exposed to radiation and chemotherapy drugs during treatment for cancer as a child are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer and other smoking-related diseases in later life.”

    Elspeth Lee, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said it was crucial that young cancer survivors were given all the necessary information and support to discourage tem for taking up smoking.

    Thanks to the development of better treatments for childhood cancer, almost eight in ten children now survive a diagnosis of the disease.

    It is estimated that there are more than 26,000 survivors of childhood cancer alive in Britain today.

    It is estimated that in the UK around 11 million adults – more than one in five of the population – smoke.

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer in the UK. It is responsible for nearly nine out of ten cases of lung cancer in the UK. With that being said, The makers of Smoke Away would like to stress that they want you to quit smoking, it does not matter how you do it just quit, whether its with our product or someone else’s.

    Tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the world, and yet it causes one in ten deaths among adults. In 2005, tobacco caused 5.4 million deaths, or an average of one death every six seconds. At the current rate, the death toll is projected to reach more than eight million annually by 2030 and a total of up to one billion deaths in the 21st century.
    Last month the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced World No Tobacco Day to highlight the dangers of cigarettes and their effects on younger generations. The WHO also revealed shocking statistics, such as tobacco kills 50 per cent of its users. This means, of the 1.3 billion smokers alive today, 650 million will be killed by tobacco.

    1. Why is smoking addictive?
    Nicotine is a psychoactive drug, which the body accepts like a “normal” messenger substance stimulating the electrical activity of the brain. It has calming effects, especially at times of stress. Smoking is a physical addiction, which is almost as strong as that of heroin, since nicotine also induces structural changes in the brain of smokers. When nicotine is suddenly withdrawn, normal functions in the brain and other parts of the body are disturbed resulting in withdrawal symptoms.
    2. What damage does smoking do to the body?
    Smoking causes many premature deaths from diseases that are largely preventable:Heart disease: Smoking is responsible for 30 per cent of all heart attacks and cardiovascular deaths. Cancer: At least 30 per cent of all cancer deaths are caused by smoking. Lung disease: More than 80 per cent of all lung problems, mainly chronic bronchitis and emphysema can be avoided by not smoking. Peripheral artery disease: Smoking is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusion, and this is extremely dangerous when associated with diabetes.
    Premature ageing of the skin: It also causes premature wrinkling of the skin of the face. On average, smokers look five years older than non-smokers of the same age.

    Others: It also contributes to stomach ulcers and osteoporosis, reduces female fertility and causes premature births and infant death.

    3. Why can smoking be even worse for men?
    Younger and middle-aged men are at a higher risk for premature arteriosclerosis and heart attacks than women of the same age. Therefore, male gender may be considered a risk factor in itself. Smoking does not just add on some risk, it multiplies the chances of developing heart disease.
    As smoking causes damage to blood vessels, it also impairs erections in middle-aged and older men and may affect the quality of their sperm. It can have the effect of sedating sperm and can impair their mobility.

    4. What are the best ways to quit smoking?
    You mean other than Smoke Away? All kidding aside, Self-help is, in fact, the only way to quit smoking. Others can give advice and support, but in the end it is up to the individual. To succeed you must have sufficient motivation to carry yourself through the task ahead. At least two-thirds of smokers are likely to find it difficult to give up smoking. However, it is not their fault that they find it difficult. They do not continue smoking because they are weak-willed or irresponsible, but because they are addicted. There are various motivations for trying to quit smoking:
    The most important is concern for health and well-being. The onset of minor ailments, such as coughs, sore throats, breathlessness, indigestion, and feeling generally less well and less fit, are early signs that the body has had enough.
    Some smokers come to resent the feeling of being controlled by their need to smoke, and are motivated to stop by their desire to regain control and self-mastery.
    To help make up your mind about stopping, make a list of all the reasons that are important for you. Make a similar list of all the positive benefits of smoking you will miss and any withdrawal difficulties you anticipate when you stop. Weigh up the lists and tell yourself that any suffering you may endure will be temporary and may last only a few weeks
    You must be prepared to work hard at stopping smoking. Here are the steps to take:
    Plan to stop on a particular day. Choose a time when you are not under too much pressure from other tasks and when you can avoid situations that you know will make it more difficult. Don’t put it off for too long unless you have to. Make plans to keep away from smokers and other tempting situations after you have stopped.
    Plan to stop smoking completely on your target day. Cutting down gradually is less effective. Telling too many people that you are going to stop is not always helpful. To be constantly asked how you are getting along can bring the subject to your mind just when you are learning not to think about it
    Prepare on a small card a list of your reasons for stopping. You may need to have this in your pocket or close at hand if things get difficult and your motivation falters after you have stopped. On the night before your target day, make sure all cigarettes, ashtrays and lighters are removed from your home. Of course the makers of Smoke Away would love for you to try our product, but we realize that sometimes you have to go through hell with a lot of different methods before you come to see us. That’s ok. Just as long as you quit in the end!

    5. How can quitting smoking be made easier?
    There is no drug for smoking that can cure your problem for you without you having to make any effort. However, there are some treatments that you can use to aid your self-help:
    Counseling and support, either in single sessions or in groups. It is also important that partners do not smoke or stop smoking at the same time. Otherwise, the smoker gets “re-infected” time and again.
    Hypnosis and acupuncture may help some people, but not everyone is susceptible to these techniques.
    Nicotine substitution like patches or chewing gum can help overcoming the habit of lighting a cigarette, and the dose can be tapered down over time.
    No one is born as a smoker. In all drug addictions, psychosocial factors determine the initial exposures. Addiction may subsequently develop if the drug has effects that people like or find rewarding. Younger people may think that it is “cool” to smoke because it makes them appear more “grown-up”. Ultimately, it is up to you to finally decide to quit smoking, on your terms.

    How the ‘pariah effect’ is changing America’s smoking habits, and why nonsmokers should show more compassion for the addicted.

    You’ve seen them: the huddled masses standing outside office doorways, in parking lots, on train platforms, cigarettes in hand, taking that last puff before going into one of the growing number of no-smoking zones in America. But dedicated smokers don’t just brave the elements; increasingly, they also have to face the scornful looks of passers-by. It’s no wonder they’re starting to feel like social pariahs. But it turns out that those disdainful glares may be motivating some smokers to quit

    A LONG, long time ago, two Martians were sent to planet Earth on a mission. When they returned home, they submitted this report to the committee: “The Earth people have an odd practice. They light a fire at the end of a poisonous substance and then suck the smoke into their body. This results in much sickness and even death. The habit is also very expensive. Strange, those Earth people!” Strange, indeed. Listen to the words of Graham Lee Hemminger: “Tobacco is a dirty weed, but I like it. It satisfies no normal need, still I like it. It makes you thin, it makes you lean. It takes the hair right off your bean. It’s the worst darn stuff I’ve ever seen. I like it

     
    Here’s another one from Russell Hoban. “What a weird thing smoking is and I can’t stop it,” he wrote. “I feel cozy, have a sense of well-being when I’m smoking, poisoning myself, killing myself slowly. Not so slowly maybe. I have all kinds of pains I don’t want to know about and I know that’s what they’re from. But when I don’t smoke I scarcely feel as if I’m living. I don’t feel as if I’m living unless I’m killing myself.”The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) reports that smoking related-diseases kill one in 10 adults globally, or cause four million deaths. “Every eight seconds, someone dies from tobacco use,” it points out. By 2030, if current trends continue, smoking will kill one in six people

    Every year, there are about 20,000 smoking-related deaths in the Philippines, where about 60 percent of men smoke. Studies have shown that tobacco use will drain nearly 20 percent of the household income of smokers’ families.

    In a country where laws abound, there are no national laws prohibiting minors from buying cigarettes. In fact, many vendors of cigarettes are children. Small wonder, as many as 40 percent of adolescents boys smoke. Most of them started smoking in their early teens. The majority of these young smokers said peer pressure was one reason why they took up smoking. Most now wish they did not smoke.

    Now, here’s something that may have been taken from a movie script: A teenager was sitting beside an old woman in a non-airconditioned bus. Thirty minutes after the bus left the terminal, the young man took a stick of cigarette from his pocket and asked the old woman, “Would you mind if I smoke?”

    Hearing those words, the old woman stopped praying her rosary and looked at the young man squarely. “Yes, I mind,” she said. “I don’t want to have cancer.”

    Physicians from all over the world agree: cigarette smoking is one of the top causes of cases. In the United States, smoking alone is directly responsible for approximately 30 percent of all cancer deaths annually.

    According to the US National Cancer Institute (NCI), smoking also causes chronic lung disease (emphysema and chronic bronchitis), cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cataracts. Smoking during pregnancy can cause stillbirth, low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome, and other serious pregnancy complications. One British survey found that nearly 99 percent of women did not know of the link between smoking and cervical cancer.

    The health risks caused by smoking are not limited to smokers. Exposure to secondhand smoke significantly increases the risk of lung cancer and heart disease in nonsmokers, as well as several respiratory illnesses in young children. (Secondhand smoke is a combination of the smoke that is released from the end of a burning cigarette and the smoke exhaled from the lungs of smokers).

    What makes cigarette smoking so deadly? Well, it contains about 4,000 chemical agents, including over 60 cancer-causing chemicals. In addition, many of these substances, such as carbon monoxide, tar, arsenic, and lead, are poisonous and toxic to the human body.

    Nicotine is a drug that is naturally present in the tobacco plant and is primarily responsible for a person’s addiction to tobacco products, including cigarettes. During smoking, nicotine is absorbed quickly into the bloodstream and travels to the brain in a matter of seconds. Nicotine causes addiction to cigarettes and other tobacco products that are similar to the addiction produced by using heroin and cocaine.

    Ready to quit smoking? Here are the benefits, if you do, according to the NCI: “Quitting smoking decreases the risk of lung and other cancers, heart attack, stroke, and chronic lung disease. The earlier a person quits, the greater the health benefit.”

    For example, research has shown that people who quit before age 50 reduce their risk of dying in the next 15 years by half compared with those who continue to smoke. Smoking low-yield cigarettes, as compared to cigarettes with higher tar and nicotine, provides no clear benefit to health

     

    Listen, the fact of the matter is that you need to quit smoking. What more reenforcement do you need? The makers of Smoke Away want you to quit smoking any way possible. With that being said, whether you use Smoke Away or not, we strongly suggest that your goal over the next month is to quit smoking, if not for you, then for who?

     

    I want to thank Henrylito D. Tacio

    According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, Women who quit smoking cut the biggest risks of death from heart disease “significantly” within five years and have a 20 percent lower chance of dying from related cancers in that time.

    The study’s authors, led by Stacey A. Kenfield of Harvard University’s School of Public Health in Boston, analyzed post- 1980 data from the Nurses’ Health Study, a survey of almost 105,000 nurses conducted starting in 1976. The study will be published in the May 7th issue of JAMA

    Researchers found that the risk of death was reduced by 13 percent within the first five years after quitting smoking, mostly due to a lower chance of dying from coronary heart disease, and dropped to the level of a person who had never smoked after 20 years.

    “Our main message here is that the harms of smoking are reversible,” Kenfield said in a telephone interview from Boston yesterday. “For some causes of death, the reduction is much higher within the first five years. So it’s never too late to quit smoking. But we also saw a reduction in other diseases, so the message is that it’s never too late to stop even though you may have been smoking for many, many years.”

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death across the globe, with more than 5 million people dying from lung cancer, heart disease and other illnesses annually, according to the World Health Organization. That figure may rise to 10 million a year by 2030.

    Follow-Up Studies

    The chance of dying from lung cancer dropped 21 percent within five years after quitting when compared with people who continued to smoke, although additional risk didn’t disappear for 30 years, the study said.

    Former smokers who had quit 20 to 30 years earlier had an 87 percent lower chance of dying from lung cancer when compared with current smokers, the study said. The risk dropped to the same level as a person who had never smoked after 20 years for all smoking-related cancers, which include lip, mouth and stomach cancers.

    The risk of death from respiratory disease dropped 18 percent within a decade after quitting, and approached the same level as a person who had never smoked after 20 years.

    Unlike previous studies, the authors followed up with the survey respondents every two years to ask about their smoking status, which Kenfield said made the findings more accurate.

    Other studies “did not see a drastic decrease in risk especially with people that had quit smoking for a long time,” Kenfield said. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer, “we saw a very nice decline in risk down to the level of a non-smoker over time.”

    As a follow up to a previous article in which the makers of Smoke Away  preached the benefits of quitting smoking and living longer, this article certainly supports that assertion.

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