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According to recent studies, the only thing cooling about menthol cigarettes may be the name at most.  The “menthol flavor” may make them even more addictive and deadlier to smokers.

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“We previously found that menthol cigarette smokers take in more nicotine and carbon monoxide per cigarette. This study shows that menthol smokers also find it harder to quit, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day,” study author Kunal Gandhi, a researcher in the division of addiction psychiatry at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyRobert Wood Johnson Medical School, said in a news release issued by the school.

In the study, which examined almost 1,700 people attending a university-run tobacco addiction clinic, blacks and Latinos who smoked menthol cigarettes had a notably harder time quitting than those smoking non-menthols. Blacks who smoked menthols, for example, had half the success in quitting as blacks using non-menthol cigarettes.

“These results build on growing evidence suggesting that menthol is not a neutral flavoring in cigarettes. It masks the harshness of the nicotine and toxins, affects the way the cigarette is smoked, and makes it more deadly and addictive,”  said Jonathan Foulds, director of the university’s Tobacco Dependence Program.

Though the makers of Smoke Away would love for you to quit smoking, they realize that in the end, the choice is entirely up to you. For more information on how to quit smoking, Log onto the Smoke Away Support site.

Childhood cancer survivors who are most likely to develop tumours as adults continue to endanger their health by smoking, research suggests.

A University of Birmingham(England) team found the highest smoking rates among patients whose type of treatment put them at greater risk later in life.

Cancer campaigners have expressed concern that the survivors are exposing themselves to “avoidable” dangers.

The researchers say more education is needed about the risks of smoking.

We are very concerned that people are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer
Professor Mike Hawkins
Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies

The study, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, pinpoints three types of childhood cancer – Hodgkin’s lymphoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Wilms’ tumour – which are known to carry an increased risk of further tumours due to the form of radiotherapy and chemotherapy used to treat them.

The researchers found that smoking was most common among people who had been treated for these cancers when children – nearly a quarter of the 10,000 former cancer sufferers surveyed.

Overall, childhood cancer survivors are around half as likely as the general population to be regular smokers.

Intervention call

Researcher Dr Clare Frobisher, based at Birmingham’s Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “It is worrying that those survivors who are most at risk of developing a new cancer as a result of their treatment, are more likely to be smokers than other childhood cancer survivors.

INCREASED RISK
A study of 16,541 survivors of childhood cancer found they were 6.2 times more likely to develop a second primary tumour than the general population
After 25 years 4.2% of survivors had developed a second primary cancer
The rate of second primary tumours among survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma was 9.2 times that of the general population, for Wilms’ tumour it was 6.9 times, and for soft tissue sarcoma it was 4.3 times
Figures from the Centre for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies

“It is clear that more work needs to be done to make sure they are aware of their increased risk of a second cancer and other related health problems if they smoke.”

The majority of smokers in the study took up smoking before the age of 20.

Dr Frobisher said: “We think intervention programmes should be put in place early, targeting cancer survivors as young as 12.”

Professor Mike Hawkins, director of the Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “We are very concerned that people who have been exposed to radiation and chemotherapy drugs during treatment for cancer as a child are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer and other smoking-related diseases in later life.”

Elspeth Lee, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said it was crucial that young cancer survivors were given all the necessary information and support to discourage tem for taking up smoking.

Thanks to the development of better treatments for childhood cancer, almost eight in ten children now survive a diagnosis of the disease.

It is estimated that there are more than 26,000 survivors of childhood cancer alive in Britain today.

It is estimated that in the UK around 11 million adults – more than one in five of the population – smoke.

Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer in the UK. It is responsible for nearly nine out of ten cases of lung cancer in the UK. With that being said, The makers of Smoke Away would like to stress that they want you to quit smoking, it does not matter how you do it just quit, whether its with our product or someone else’s.

In the United States, an estimated 25.1 million men (23.4 percent) and 20.9 million women (18.5 percent) are smokers. These people are at higher risk of heart attack and stroke. The latest estimates for persons age 18 and older show…*

  • Among non-Hispanic whites, 24.1 percent of men and 20.4 percent of women smoke (2004). 
  • Among non-Hispanic blacks, 23.9 percent of men and 17.2 percent of women smoke.
  • Among Hispanics, 18.9 percent of men and 10.9 percent of women smoke.
  • Among Asians (only), 17.8 percent of men and 4.8 percent of women smoke.
  • Among American Indians/Alaska Natives, 37.3 percent of men and 28.5 percent of women smoke.
  • Studies show that smoking prevalence is higher among those who had earned a GED diploma (39.6 percent) and among those with 9-11 years of education (34.0 percent) compared with those with more than 16 years of education (8.0 percent). It’s highest among persons living below the poverty level (29.1 percent).

* National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), 2004, National Center for Health Statistics and NHLBI

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