You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘cancer’ tag.

Larry Jukes said he remembers when he could buy 10 cigarette packs for $2.50.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he's upset about the hike but doesn't expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he’s upset about the hike but doesn’t expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

But he’d now take the days when — just last month — he could buy his carton of choice for $49.

Thanks in part to the largest-ever federal cigarette tax increase — a nearly 62-cents-a-pack hike that starts Wednesday but was reflected in many prices earlier — Jukes on Tuesday paid more than $58 for a 10-pack carton at the Cigarette Store in Denver, Colorado.

That same store was selling it about $9 cheaper weeks ago. Jukes and other shoppers there said they feel stuck and taken advantage of.

“They’re picking on us poor people, the ones that smoke,” Jukes, a 65-year-old who has been smoking since he was a teen, said of the government. “They have been for years.” Video Watch Jukes argue smokers are unfairly targeted »

The cigarette excise tax that tobacco companies must pay the federal government rose Wednesday by 61.6 cents per pack, or $6.16 per carton. The tax now comes to about $10.10 per carton, or $1.01 per pack.

But major tobacco companies began incorporating that increase into their prices to wholesalers in March. And the companies, wholesalers and retailers in many cases gave prices a boost beyond the tax increase, in part to make up for an expected drop in sales caused by the hike, some of them said.

“We don’t anticipate another raise for Wednesday. The [March increase in prices] was the raise,” said Mary Szarmach, vice president at Colorado-based Cigarette Store Corp., which operates 85 stores in five states. “The manufacturers took what they needed beyond [the tax increase] to maintain their profit margin and take care of what they think will be diminishing sales. …

“And to maintain gross profit margin, retailers in general tacked on a little, too.” Video Watch how and why the tax hike was instituted »

If the increase does scare off customers, 83-year-old Gloria Egger isn’t likely to be one of them, she said. She said she’s upset at the government for raising the tax, but Egger, who has been smoking since she was 18, isn’t likely to quit. iReport.com: Share your thoughts on the tobacco tax increase

“I think it’s ridiculous. … They’re picking on smokers,” Egger said at the Denver store, where she bought two cartons Tuesday. “I think they’re trying to run the tobacco companies out of business.

“As old as I am, I’m not going to quit smoking, regardless of what they do.” See other reactions to the tax hike »

Federal taxes also are going up Wednesday on other tobacco products, including cigars. Federal per-cigar taxes, which vary based on weight and price, used to be capped at 4.9 cents but now are capped at 40.26 cents.

The tobacco tax hikes, which President Obama signed into law in February, will be used to finance an expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP. The expansion, which will cost $35 million over five years, is expected to secure federally funded health care for an additional 4 million children.

Before the expansion, SCHIP covered almost 7 million children whose parents earn too much to qualify for Medicaid — the federal health insurance program for the poor — but can’t afford private insurance.

Dave Bowersox, who bought a box of Prime Time Little Cigars at the Denver store Tuesday, said he’s fine with the tobacco tax increases.

“I think tobacco, alcohol, that kind of stuff should be taxed instead of gasoline and food — things that are necessary for people to survive,” Bowersox said.

But near Orlando, Florida, cigar smoker Leah Fuller called the hikes “ridiculous.”

“There are [other] things that you could be targeting in the U.S. right now. Why the tobacco industry?” Fuller said. “I, personally, smoke cigars to relax. Why am I being punished for it?”

Jeff Borysiewicz, founder of Orlando-based Corona Cigar Co., said he believed the federal tax hike will cause cigar sales to drop. And he said the increase comes as Florida is considering a $1-per-cigar state tax hike. iReporters debate whether the change in price is fair »

Cigarettes, too, have been hit by state excise tax increases. Since January 2002, the average state cigarette tax has increased from 43 cents per pack to $1.21 per pack, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

A conservative estimate for the average per-pack cigarette price in the U.S., based on data collected from states and territories at the end of 2008 and adjusted for the federal tax increase, is $4.80, the group’s Eric Lindblom said.

Tobacco company Philip Morris USA raised list prices for its major brands by about 71 cents per pack last month “in direct response to the tax increase,” said Bill Phelps, spokesman for Philip Morris’ parent company, Altria.

RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co. on March 16 raised its cigarettes’ list prices by 41 to 44 cents per pack and, in many cases, reduced discounts to retailers, basically keeping “our pricing in line with the competition,” spokesman David Howard said.

“The federal tax increase was the primary driver,” Howard said.

Both companies said they expect a decrease in sales, with Howard noting industry analysts have estimated a drop of 6 percent to 8 percent. One factor in Philip Morris’ decision to increase list prices beyond the tax hike was the company’s expectation that the new tax level will decrease sales, Phelps said.

Not all U.S. sales declines would be due to smokers quitting, Phelps said.

“Tax increases create an incentive for people to bring cigarettes into the country illegally — [from places] where they don’t have to pay that higher tax,” Phelps said.

Nick Hamad, a tobacco store owner in Seattle, Washington, said he thinks the tax will ruin the American tobacco industry.

“If we lose the sales, the state will lose the revenue,” he said. “We will be hurt, the state will be hurt and eventually the consumers are being hurt.”

As for Jukes, higher prices probably won’t force him to quit smoking, he said.

“I’ve been smoking about 50 years,” Jukes said to which the makers of Smoke Away say, “should anyone have any sympathy for Jukes or other smokers for that matter? The answer is No. And if you want to quit smoking, then a good first step is to contact the makers of Smoke Away on their site or call 1-800-611-5930

Advertisements

In what has to be one of the more stupid things we have seen in quite some time. Yahoo Answers has lost their moral compass in publishing an entry titled:

How do you smoke a cigarette.

Not only is it irresponsible but it is leading others to smoke through this virtual enabling of young smoker wannabe’s. Hey Yahoo, wake up and take this down! The makers of Smoke Away are trying to help, but what are you doing?

yahoo1

  1. What are the effects of cigarette smoking on cancer rates?
  2. Cigarette smoking causes 87 percent of lung cancer deaths . Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women . Smoking is also responsible for most cancers of the larynx, oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, and bladder. In addition, it is a cause of kidney, pancreatic, cervical, and stomach cancers, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.

  3. Are there any health risks for nonsmokers?
  4. The health risks caused by cigarette smoking are not limited to smokers. Exposure to secondhand smoke, or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), significantly increases the risk of lung cancer and heart disease in nonsmokers, as well as several respiratory illnesses in young children. (Secondhand smoke is a combination of the smoke that is released from the end of a burning cigarette and the smoke exhaled from the lungs of smokers.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s National Toxicology Program, and the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have all classified secondhand smoke as a known human carcinogen—a category reserved for agents for which there is sufficient scientific evidence that they cause cancer. The U.S. EPA has estimated that exposure to secondhand smoke causes about 3,000 lung cancer deaths among nonsmokers and is responsible for up to 300,000 cases of lower respiratory tract infections in children up to 18 months of age in the United States each year.

  5. What harmful chemicals are found in cigarette smoke?
  6. Cigarette smoke contains about 4,000 chemical agents, including over 60 carcinogens. In addition, many of these substances, such as carbon monoxide, tar, arsenic, and lead, are poisonous and toxic to the human body. Nicotine is a drug that is naturally present in the tobacco plant and is primarily responsible for a person’s addiction to tobacco products, including cigarettes. During smoking, nicotine is absorbed quickly into the bloodstream and travels to the brain in a matter of seconds. Nicotine causes addiction to cigarettes and other tobacco products that is similar to the addiction produced by using heroin and cocaine.

  7. How does exposure to tobacco smoke affect the cigarette smoker?
  8. Smoking harms nearly every major organ of the body. The risk of developing smoking-related diseases, such as lung and other cancers, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory illnesses, increases with total lifetime exposure to cigarette smoke. This includes the number of cigarettes a person smokes each day, the intensity of smoking (i.e., the size and frequency of puffs), the age at which smoking began, the number of years a person has smoked, and a smoker’s secondhand smoke exposure.

  9. How would quitting smoking affect the risk of developing cancer and other diseases?
  10. Smoking cessation has major and immediate health benefits for men and women of all ages. Quitting smoking decreases the risk of lung and other cancers, heart attack, stroke, and chronic lung disease. The earlier a person quits, the greater the health benefit. For example, research has shown that people who quit before age 50 reduce their risk of dying in the next 15 years by half compared with those who continue to smoke. Smoking low-yield cigarettes, as compared to cigarettes with higher tar and nicotine, provides no clear benefit to health. For additional information on quitting smoking, why not check out the Smoke Away website?

A key mechanism by which smoking triggers genetic changes that cause lung cancer has been unravelled.

Researchers have shown exposure to cigarette smoke slows production of a protein called FANCD2 in lung cells.

This protein plays a key role in repairing damage to DNA, and causing faulty cells to commit suicide before they go on to become cancerous.

The study, led by Oregon Health and Science University, appears in the British Journal of Cancer.

LUNG CANCER
Most common cancer in the world with 1.3 million people diagnosed every year
Second most common form of cancer in the UK after breast cancer
Over 38,300 new cases, and more than 33,000 deaths in the UK each year
Smoking responsible for 90% of cases in the UK

It raises hopes of improved treatments for the disease.

Lead researcher Dr Laura Hays said: “These findings show the important role FANCD2 plays in protecting lung cells against cigarette smoke and may explain why cigarette smoke is so toxic to these cells.”

The researchers suspect other proteins also play a role in fixing DNA and weeding out defective cells.

However, their work showed that cells with very high levels of FANCD2 were resistant to the toxic effects of smoke – suggesting this protein is key.

Artificial windpipe

The researchers created an artificial windpipe in the lab to replicate the environment of a smoker’s lung.

They then studied the effects of cigarette smoke on different proteins in cells and found that FANCD2 levels were low enough to allow DNA damage.

FANCD2 is part of a family of proteins involved in an inherited condition called Fanconi anaemia.

People with the condition are more likely to develop cancers at a young age and have low levels of these proteins.

Dr Lesley Walker, director of cancer information at Cancer Research UK, said: “This interesting piece of science adds to our understanding of why smoking is so deadly.

“Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer and causes nine out of ten cases of lung cancer.

“But the good news is that quitting works – after five years without smoking your risk of a heart attack will have fallen to half that of a smoker.

“And after ten years your risk of lung cancer will have halved too.”

So quit smoking! Why not quit smoking? What are the triggers that are causing you to continue to smoke? If we can ID those triggers, then the makers of Smoke Away believe that you’re well on your way to heading down the path of a successful quit. Check in with our users over at Smoke Away Support for even more tips and advice on how to quit smoking, whether you use our product or not. Just quit.

20 reasons to quit smoking American Cancer Society big tobacco cancer cdc cigarette labels cigarettes cigarette smoking famous people who smoked and died because of it how to quit smoking how to stop smoking preventing children from smoking preventing smoking in chidlren quit meters. quitting smoking aides quit smoking quit smoking action plan quit smoking guidelines quit smoking initiatives quit smoking sites quit smoking tips quit smoking videos quit smoking websites quitting smoking quitting smoking reasons Qutting Smoking qutting smoking for new years qutting smoking news Reasons to quit smoking second hand smoke smoke away smokeaway smokeaway support smoke away support smokers quiz smoking smoking and chidlren Smoking and Children smoking and teens smoking cessation smoking cessation steps smoking cessation videos smoking effects smoking in the workplace Smoking News smoking quiz smoking related illness Smoking Statistics steps to quit smoking Stopping smoking stopping smoking for the new year stop smoking stop smoking aides stop smoking assistance stop smoking for kids stop smoking for new years stop smoking help stop smoking in 2008 stop smoking links stop smoking meters stop smoking news stop smoking products stop smoking programs stop smoking quiz stop smoking resources stop smoking support Stop Smoking Tips stop smoking tools Stop Smoking Videos the american cancer society the reasons why people smoke tips to quit smoking Ways to quit smoking ways to quit smoking in the new year women and smoking

Flickr Photos