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Women who smoke have heart attacks nearly 14 years earlier than women who don’t smoke, Norwegian doctors reported in a study presented to the European Society of Cardiology. For men, the gap is not so dramatic; male smokers have heart attacks about six years earlier than men who don’t smoke.

“This is not a minor difference,” said Dr. Silvia Priori, a cardiologist at the Scientific Institute in Pavia, Italy. “Women need to realize they are losing much more than men when they smoke,” she said. Priori was not connected to the research.

Dr. Morten Grundtvig and colleagues from the Innlandet Hospital Trust in Lillehammer, Norway, based their study on data from 1,784 patients admitted for a first heart attack at a hospital in Lillehammer.

Their study found that the men on average had their first heart attack at age 72 if they didn’t smoke, and at 64 if they did.

Women in the study had their first heart attack at age 81 if they didn’t smoke, and at age 66 if they did.

After adjusting for other heart risk factors like blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes, researchers found that the difference for women was about 14 years and for men, about six years.

Previous studies looking at a possible gender difference have been inconclusive.

Doctors have long suspected that female hormones protect women against heart disease. Estrogen is thought to raise the levels of good cholesterol as well as enabling blood vessel walls to relax more easily, thus lowering the chances of a blockage.

Grundtvig said that smoking might make women go through menopause earlier, leaving them less protected against a heart attack. With rising rates of smoking in women – compared with falling rates in men – Grundtvig said that doctors expect to see increased heart disease in women.

“Smoking might erase the natural advantage that women have,” said Dr. Robert Harrington, a professor of medicine at Duke University and spokesman for the American College of Cardiology.

Doctors aren’t yet sure if other cardiac risk factors like cholesterol and obesity also affect women differently.

“The difference in how smoking affects women and men is profound,” Harrington said. “Unless women don’t smoke or quit, they risk ending up with the same terrible diseases as men, only at a much earlier age.”

The bottom line is this, smoking kills and you need to quit smoking. What are you going to do about it? Whether you use Smoke Away or not, is not the point. You have to quit smoking!

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We spend an inordinate amount of time telling people, no, pleading with people to quit smoking either with the help of Smoke Away or without. The point being that is important for smokers to realize that quitting smoking is the name of the game because it kills you and it hurts others. With that in mind here are 11 thoughts and facts about second hand smoke you probably did not know,

  • Secondhand smoke has been classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a known cause of cancer in humans (Group A carcinogen).
  • Secondhand smoke exposure causes disease and premature death in children and adults who do not smoke. Secondhand smoke contains hundreds of chemicals known to be toxic or carcinogenic, including formaldehyde, benzene, vinyl chloride, arsenic ammonia and hydrogen cyanide.
  • Secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,400 lung cancer deaths and 22,700-69,600 heart disease deaths in adult nonsmokers in the United States each year.
  • Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke at work are at increased risk for adverse health effects. Levels of secondhand smoke in restaurants and bars were found to be 2 to 5 times higher than in residences with smokers and 2 to 6 times higher than in office workplaces.
  • Since 1999, 70 percent of the U.S. workforce worked under a smoke-free policy, ranging from 83.9 percent in Utah to 48.7 percent in Nevada.  Workplace productivity was increased and absenteeism was decreased among former smokers compared with current smokers.
  • Eighteen states – Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington and Vermont – as well as the District of Columbia prohibit smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. Montana and Utah prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants; bars will go smokefree in 2009. New Hampshire prohibits smoking in some public places, including all restaurants and bars. Four states – Florida, Idaho, Louisiana and Nevada – prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants, but exempt stand-alone bars. Fifteen states partially or totally prevent (preempt) local communities from passing smokefree air ordinances stronger than the statewide law. Iowa, Nebraska and Oregon have passed legislation prohibiting smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars, but the laws have not taken effect yet.
  • Secondhand smoke is especially harmful to young children. Secondhand smoke is responsible for between 150,000 and 300,000 lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children under 18 months of age, resulting in between 7,500 and 15,000 hospitalizations each year, and causes 430 sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) deaths in the United States annually.
  • Secondhand smoke exposure may cause buildup of fluid in the middle ear, resulting in 790,000 physician office visits per year.  Secondhand smoke can also aggravate symptoms in 400,000 to 1,000,000 children with asthma.
  • In the United States, 21 million, or 35 percent of, children live in homes where residents or visitors smoke in the home on a regular basis. Approximately 50-75 percent of children in the United States have detectable levels of cotinine, the breakdown product of nicotine in the blood.
  • Research indicates that private research conducted by cigarette company Philip Morris in the 1980s showed that secondhand smoke was highly toxic, yet the company suppressed the finding during the next two decades.
  • The current Surgeon General’s Report concluded that scientific evidence indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Short exposures to secondhand smoke can cause blood platelets to become stickier, damage the lining of blood vessels, decrease coronary flow velocity reserves, and reduce heart rate variability, potentially increasing the risk of heart attack.
  • This is tough to watch but it cannot help but drive the point home that if you continue to smoke, you will end up like the person in this video. Smoke Away as it has maintained from day one of this blog, does not care how you quit, whether it’s with our product or not, we just want you to quit.

    Recently we have been getting a lot of calls and emails on just how to use Smoke Away and how it works.

    When you start the program, on your first night before you go to bed, you will take the recommended dosage of Formula 1 with some food or milk and get a good nights rest. When you awake you will repeat your dosage of Formula 1 with breakfast, lunch, and dinner. You will continue this regimen for three days. On the fourth day you will assess your progress. If you are feeling good, try to decrease the dosage by one capsule. If you are not feeling so good, then do not reduce your capsule intake.

    On the fifth and sixth days, if you are feeling pretty good, then reduce your capsule intake again, what this means is your body is slowly becoming adjusted to your new found system. Do not forget about the support and maintenance products. At this point you do not want to completely stop taking your dosages, in other words, do not reduce your dosage below one capsule three times a day.

    If you need temporary relief, and chances are you will, simply place three tablets of Smoke Away® Homeopathic Medicine under your tongue as soon as you need them. Take the Formula 2 maintenance formulas as directed. For more information on what else comes with your order, go to the Smoke Away products page for complete directions for usage.

    You should listen to the CD included in each kit sold on this site for at least 14 days. Even after that, continue to use as needed. The audio CD was created to give you encouragement and support, to help get you through the tough times. If you need more help, do not hesitate to call or email us, or even respond to this blog post. For more information you can also logo onto the Smoke Away support site as well.

    From the department of the obvious we have the following: Young women who smoke are twice as likely to have a stroke as their nonsmoking peers, according to a new study. And the more cigarettes a woman smokes per day, the bigger her risk.

    The study was published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers, who studied women ages 15 to 49, found that women who smoke one to 10 cigarettes per day increase their stroke risk 2.2 times. Women who smoke 11 to 20 cigarettes per day increase stroke risk 2.5 times, while those who smoke 21 to 39 per day increase stroke risk more than fourfold. The heaviest smokers — those who smoke 40 or more cigarettes per day — increase their risk 9.1 times.

    The study followed 466 women who had suffered their first strokes. A comparison group consisted of 604 women of similar age, race, and ethnicity who had not had a stroke. A detailed smoking history was obtained during face-to-face interviews. Women were classified according to their smoking status as never-smokers, former smokers, or current smokers.

    “Our study adds strong evidence that cutting down helps reduce stroke risk, but quitting is unquestionably the best option,” researcher John Cole, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, says in a news release.

    In 2005, an estimated 21% of American women aged 18-44 were cigarette smokers, according to researchers. The good news is that when women stop smoking, their risk of having a stroke decreases. Stroke risk decreases significantly three years after smoking stops. After five years of being smoke-free, former smokers have the same risk of stroke as never-smokers. And the earlier that smokers quit, the better. People who quit smoking prior to age 35 can have the same life expectancy as those who have never smoked.

    The researchers point out that media campaigns and high prices for tobacco products help curb smoking rates among young people. “Our study supports the need to target smoking as a preventable and modifiable risk factor for cerebrovascular disease in young women,” they write.

    Smoke Away implores all that are merely thinking of quitting smoking, to quit smoking today, either with our product or not!

    Think you know what’s up when it comes to cigarette smoking and its effects? Better think again!

    1. Myth: Nicotine causes cancer.

    Fact: Nicotine is not a carcinogen. However, there are 4,000 known chemicals in cigarettes, and more than 60 of them are carcinogens.

    2. Myth: Smoking is just a bad habit that you can stop at any time.

    Fact: There is a habit component to smoking, but there are also biological changes to the brain that create the addiction.

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which occur naturally in the brain, are activated when nicotine is consumed. The activation period is followed by a desensitized state in which the receptors become unresponsive. As more nicotine is consumed, and the number of unresponsive receptors increases, the smoker experiences less pleasure from each cigarette. This makes it necessary to increase the number of cigarettes smoked to achieve the desired level of pleasure.

    3. Myth: Low nicotine cigarettes are safer.

    Fact: The blend of tobacco in a low nicotine cigarette is exactly the same as in a regular cigarette. The reason cigarette companies can call them “low” has to do with the way nicotine levels are tested.

    As the regulator of cigarettes, the Federal Trade Commission tests for nicotine and tar levels with machines that draw air through a cigarette in two-second puffs, repeated once per minute, until the cigarette is burned to the filter. The smoke that is generated in this manner tests low in nicotine.

    However, this test doesn’t approximate the way people really smoke. Smokers will compensate for the lower yield of nicotine by puffing more, or taking longer drags. Consequently, the smoker will actually inhale the same or more nicotine and tar, even though it is considered a low-nicotine cigarette.

    Another reason the machine tests are considered inaccurate is cigarette manufacturers put ventilation holes in the filters. These holes allow more air to be drawn in, which dilutes the smoke going into the machine, making it seem as though the cigarette being tested contains less tar and nicotine. But when people actually smoke these cigarettes, their fingers generally cover the holes in the filters.

    4. Myth: Medicinal nicotine found in nicotine patches and nicotine gum is just as addictive as smoking.

    Fact: The delivery system used to bring nicotine to the brain is what determines the level of addictiveness. Medicinal nicotine is released slowly through the venous system. The brain receives only small quantities, reducing the potential for addiction.

    Inhaling brings nicotine to the brain extremely fast, which is why it is so addictive.

    “Inhaling gets nicotine to the brain within five heartbeats,” Hurt said.

    5. Myth: A smoker who tries to quit without assistance can maintain abstinence over the long term.

    Fact: Chances of long-term abstinence for smokers who try to go it alone are less than 5 percent. With assistance, the smoker’s chance of staying away from cigarettes increases to 30 to 35 percent.

    Smoke Away cannot emphasize enough how important it is to quit smoking either with our help or without. It’s your choice, make it today!

     

    In an effort to try and cut down the amount of smoking related ilnesses emenating from firefighters, The International Association of Fire Fighters has announced the launch of a new initiative to help fire fighters, family members and friends to quit smoking cigarettes.

    “Our goal is to help make the IAFF the first smoke-free union,” IAFF General President Harold Schaitberger said in his address to delegates at the IAFF 49th Convention.
    The IAFF is collaborating with pharmaceutical company Pfizer Inc. to promote smoking cessation. Schaitberger and Pfizer CEO Jeff Kindler first announced the joint initiative at the IAFF Health and Safety Conference in Chicago, Illinois, in October 2007.
    The campaign includes materials designed to help fire fighters understand the risks of smoking and provide information on how to quit. These and other resources are available on a new web site at www.iaff.org/smokefree. In the coming weeks, the campaign will add new resources, including a DVD featuring stories from fire fighters about how they quit smoking. The web site and other materials are available to assist IAFF affiliates across North America in reaching out to members, families and communities to promote and encourage smoking cessation.
    Smoking is a major health risk for fire fighters who are already at high risk for illnesses, including heart disease, respiratory disease and certain cancers. In addition, smoking is the leading cause of fires and a significant occupational risk for fire fighters.
    “We congratulate the IAFF for its commitment to this campaign and look forward to working together toward the goal of a smoke-free union,” Kindler said. “Fire fighters are respected leaders in their communities, and this program on smoking cessation reaffirms that leadership.”
    “Fire fighters place themselves in harm’s way, confront dangerous environments, high heat and flames, and exposure to burning materials,” Schaitberger said. “It’s stressful work and some respond to stress by smoking. Yet smoking increases the health risks fire fighters face. We want to help prevent that.”
    The International Association of Fire Fighters, headquartered in Washington, DC, represents more than 288,000 full-time professional fire fighters and paramedics who protect 85 percent of the nation’s population. More information is available at www.iaff.org
    Pfizer discovers and develops innovative medicines to treat and help prevent disease for both people and animals. We also partner with healthcare providers, governments and local communities around the world to expand access to our medicines and to provide better quality healthcare and health system support.
    Smoke Away applauds these efforts to try and help people quit smoking either with our help or not.

    Childhood cancer survivors who are most likely to develop tumours as adults continue to endanger their health by smoking, research suggests.

    A University of Birmingham(England) team found the highest smoking rates among patients whose type of treatment put them at greater risk later in life.

    Cancer campaigners have expressed concern that the survivors are exposing themselves to “avoidable” dangers.

    The researchers say more education is needed about the risks of smoking.

    We are very concerned that people are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer
    Professor Mike Hawkins
    Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies

    The study, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, pinpoints three types of childhood cancer – Hodgkin’s lymphoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Wilms’ tumour – which are known to carry an increased risk of further tumours due to the form of radiotherapy and chemotherapy used to treat them.

    The researchers found that smoking was most common among people who had been treated for these cancers when children – nearly a quarter of the 10,000 former cancer sufferers surveyed.

    Overall, childhood cancer survivors are around half as likely as the general population to be regular smokers.

    Intervention call

    Researcher Dr Clare Frobisher, based at Birmingham’s Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “It is worrying that those survivors who are most at risk of developing a new cancer as a result of their treatment, are more likely to be smokers than other childhood cancer survivors.

    INCREASED RISK
    A study of 16,541 survivors of childhood cancer found they were 6.2 times more likely to develop a second primary tumour than the general population
    After 25 years 4.2% of survivors had developed a second primary cancer
    The rate of second primary tumours among survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma was 9.2 times that of the general population, for Wilms’ tumour it was 6.9 times, and for soft tissue sarcoma it was 4.3 times
    Figures from the Centre for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies

    “It is clear that more work needs to be done to make sure they are aware of their increased risk of a second cancer and other related health problems if they smoke.”

    The majority of smokers in the study took up smoking before the age of 20.

    Dr Frobisher said: “We think intervention programmes should be put in place early, targeting cancer survivors as young as 12.”

    Professor Mike Hawkins, director of the Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “We are very concerned that people who have been exposed to radiation and chemotherapy drugs during treatment for cancer as a child are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer and other smoking-related diseases in later life.”

    Elspeth Lee, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said it was crucial that young cancer survivors were given all the necessary information and support to discourage tem for taking up smoking.

    Thanks to the development of better treatments for childhood cancer, almost eight in ten children now survive a diagnosis of the disease.

    It is estimated that there are more than 26,000 survivors of childhood cancer alive in Britain today.

    It is estimated that in the UK around 11 million adults – more than one in five of the population – smoke.

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer in the UK. It is responsible for nearly nine out of ten cases of lung cancer in the UK. With that being said, The makers of Smoke Away would like to stress that they want you to quit smoking, it does not matter how you do it just quit, whether its with our product or someone else’s.

     

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 44.5 million US adults were current smokers in 2006 (the most recent year for which numbers are available). This is 20.8% of all adults (23.9% of men, 18.0% of women) — more than 1 out of 5 people.

    When broken down by race/ethnicity, the numbers were as follows:

    Whites 21.9%
    African Americans 23.0%
    Hispanics 15.2%
    American Indians/Alaska Natives 32.4%
    Asian Americans 10.4%

    The numbers were higher in younger age groups. In 2006, CDC reported almost 24% of those 18 to 44 years old were current smokers, compared to 10.2% in those aged 65 or older.

    Nationwide, 22.3% of high school students and 8.1% of middle school students were smoking in 2004. More White and Hispanic students smoked cigarettes.  Can anyone tell me why the highest percentages would among American Indians and native Alaskans?

    Listen, as long as you’re sitting there wondering who smokes, why don’t you, if you smoke check out Smoke Away, or if you don’t but have a friend or loved one that smokes, steer them towards Smoke Away? What do you have to lose? Besides that craving to smoke?

    Chewing tobacco and snuff are less dangerous than cigarettes but the smokeless products still raise the risk of oral cancer by 80 percent, the World Health Organization’s cancer agency said on Tuesday.

    The review of 11 studies worldwide showed people who chewed tobacco and used snuff also had a 60 percent higher risk of esophagus and pancreatic cancer.

    The researchers sought to quantify the risk of smokeless tobacco after a number of studies differed on just how dangerous the products were, said Paolo Boffetta, an epidemiologist at the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer.

    “What we did was try to quantify the burden of smokeless cancer,” he said in a telephone interview. “This has never been attempted in such a systematic way before.”

    The researchers, who published their findings in Lancet Oncology, did this by looking at population-wide studies and trials of both humans and animals.

    They found frequency of use varies greatly both across and within countries, depending on sex, age, ethnic origin and economic background, and were highest in the United States, Sweden and India.

    They also found that while snuff and chew were less dangerous than smoking because they were not linked to lung cancer, getting cigarette users to switch was not good public policy.

    “If all smokers did this there would be a net benefit,” Boffetta said. “The point is we don’t know whether this would happen and there is no data to suggest these smokers would stop or switch.”

    Smoke Away wants you to quit the usage of any nicotine laced product. Remember, it’s not just smoking that kills, its the addiction to nicotine as well!

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