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We know, you know everything there is about the effects about cigarettes and smoking. Well, sometimes you need to be reminded what not quitting smoking can do to you. The makers of Smoke Away present for you 17 facts that you may or may not have know about smoking.

  1. Smoking-related diseases kill one in 10 adults globally, or cause four million deaths. If the same rate continues, by 2030 smoking will kill one in six people.
  2. About a third of the male adult global population smokes.
  3. Cigarette smoke  contains 11 chemical compounds that are known to cause cancer.
  4. Someone dies every eight seconds from tobacco use
  5. Every minute 10 million cigarettes are sold
  6. Among young teens (aged 13 to 15), about one in five smokes worldwide.
  7. Half of long-term smokers will die from tobacco. Every cigarette smoked cuts at least five minutes of life on average – about the time taken to smoke it.
  8. Smoking is the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death. It is a prime factor in heart disease, stroke and chronic lung disease. It can cause cancer of the lungs, larynx, esophagus, mouth, and bladder, and contributes to cancer of the cervix, pancreas, and kidneys.
  9. More than 4,000 toxic or carcinogenic chemicals have been found in tobacco smoke.
  10. Cigarette smoke contains benzene, carbon monoxide, arsenic, hydrogen cyanide and polonium 210.
  11. Tobacco is an addictive substance. Smokers who use other drugs such as heroin, methadone, amphetamines and barbiturates rate tobacco as their most addictive drug.
  12. At least a quarter of all deaths from heart diseases and about three-quarters of world’s chronic bronchitis are related to smoking.
  13. A 1998 survey found that tobacco companies were among the top 10 advertisers in 18 out of 66 countries surveyed.
  14. Through advertising, tobacco firms try to link smoking with athletic prowess, sexual attractiveness, success, adult sophistication, adventure and self-fulfillment
  15. Evidence shows that around 50% of those who start smoking in adolescent years go on to smoke for 15 to 20 years.
  16. Peer-reviewed studies show teenagers are heavily influenced by tobacco advertising.
  17. The tobacco industry has changed the way it advertises in the last 30 years. Now, only 10% of advertising expenditure goes to print and, outdoor ads, while more than half goes to promotional allowances and items, such as t-shirts for young people or lighters and key rings.

It’s up to you. Right now, do you want to keep smoking? Or continue to puff away? It’s your choice and Smoke Away is here to help you make the right decision.

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Lets get right to it!

  1.  You could have a higher rate of infections In October, the federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made its first ever recommendation that all smokers ages 19 to 64 be added to a short list of candidates for the pneumococcal vaccine. That’s because there are very strong data showing that the risk of infection by pneumonia-causing bacteria is substantially greater for smokers than for nonsmokers. 
  2.  Diabetes anyone? As if we need any more risk factors for diabetes, an analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association last year found that across 25 prior studies, current smokers have a 44 percent greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers do, and the risk was strongest for those with the heaviest habit, who clocked 20 or more cigarettes per day. In an accompanying editorial, researchers made a striking estimation: That some 12 percent of all type 2 diabetes cases nationwide might be attributable to smoking.
  3. It clouds judgement Smoking may cloud the mind, according to accumulating research. A June study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that smoking in middle age is linked to memory problems and to a slide in reasoning abilities, though these risks appeared lessened for those who’d long quit; this is important, the authors wrote, because other research has shown that people with mild cognitive impairment in midlife develop dementia at an accelerated rate. Their report piggybacks on several focused on the older set: A 2007 analysis of 19 prior studies concluded that elderly smokers face a heightened risk of dementia and cognitive decline, compared with lifelong nonsmokers. And in 2004, researchers reported in Ne urology that smoking appeared to hasten cognitive decline in dementia-free elderly smokers, bringing it on several times faster than in their nonsmoking peers.
  4. Forget a robust sex life. If men want to hop aboard the Viagra bandwagon, mounting evidence suggests that puffing cigarettes might be just their ticket. Smokers are more apt to experience erectile dysfunction than nonsmokers are, and this risk climbs as the number of cigarettes smoked increases. A study in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2007 tracked more than 7,500 Chinese men with low risk for artherosclerosis, a chief underlying cause of erectile dysfunction, and found that smoking could independently hike a man’s chance of wrangling with the sexual condition. Preventing smoking is an “important approach” for cutting the risk of ED, the researchers concluded.
  5. If you’re 30, you’ll look 50 everywhere. Not only does smoking contribute to premature facial wrinkles, but a 2007 study in the Archives of Dermatology found that it may also lead to wrinkling of skin that rarely sees the light of day—in areas such as the inner arm and perhaps the buttocks.
  6. Menopause at an early age?. Women who smoke face an increased risk of infertility, and they may experience natural menopause at a younger age than do nonsmokers, according to the 2004 and the 2001 Surgeon General’s Reports, respectively. Further evidence: A 2001 animal study in Nature Genetics found that chemicals in cigarette smoke can hurry menopause by killing off egg cells made by ovaries, thereby dwindling the egg cell reserve. Since the timing of menopause is dictated by the size of a woman’s egg cell reserve—which is stocked with about a million eggs at birth and vanishes by menopause—anything that speeds up its loss could logically lead to a much earlier onset of fertility troubles, notes Jonathan Tilly, one of the study’s authors and director of the Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital. More worrisome: Women who smoke during pregnancy may be compromising not only their own future fertility but the fertility of their unborn daughters. In studies testing that idea, mice exposed to chemicals in cigarette smoke during gestation were born with shrunken egg reserves. “Even under the best-chance scenario—you’re a nonsmoker, you’re healthy, you’re young, you eat well, you’re in shape—human fertility isn’t 100 percent,” says Tilly. “Anything you can do to make it better is certainly worth your while.”
  7. Time to wear the cheater glasses. Several studies have found a robust link between smoking and eye disease, specifically age-related macular degeneration, which can permanently blur vision or cause blindness. A 2005 review of 17 studies in the journal Eye reported that active smokers may face two to three times the risk for developing the disease experienced by those who have never smoked.
  8.  Weak bones, brittle bones. Smoking weakens the body’s scaffolding and is a serious risk factor for osteoporosis, according to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. It’s been shown to fritter away bone density in postmenopausal women and to hike the risk of hip fractures in both sexes, according to the 2004 Surgeon General’s Report. (People who endure hip fractures are 12 to 20 percent more likely to die than those who don’t, the Report notes, though there are ways osteoporosis sufferers can protect themselves.) Smokers may also experience slower healing of broken bones and wounded tissues than do nonsmokers.
  9. It roughs up your innards. Sure, cigarettes may be smooth to inhale, but they can rough up the digestive system, leading to heartburn, peptic ulcers, and possibly gallstones, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. What’s more, current and former smokers have an elevated risk of developing Crohn’s disease, a condition characterized by inflammation in the digestive tract and causing pain and diarrhea, says NIDDK.
  10. Kiss your quality of life goodbye. Men who have never smoked live on average 10 years longer than their peers who smoke heavily, according to an October report in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Moreover, they enjoyed a higher quality of life throughout those extra years, throwing sand in the face of the old smokers’ defense that an early death is a small price to pay for a lifetime of pleasure . The study’s Finnish authors drew their conclusion after scrutinizing data on more than 1,600 men tracked for nearly 30 years.
  11. Bonus! Did you say cancer? Not to belabor the point, but tobacco use and smoking have been linked to much more than lung cancer. In September, the CDC released a report estimating that more than 2 million cases of tobacco-related cancers were diagnosed nationwide between 1999 and 2004. Lung and bronchial cancer topped the list, naturally, but other types included stomach, pancreatic, kidney, urinary bladder, and cervical cancer. “We knew this was a big problem and a preventable problem,” says Sherri Stewart, the epidemiologist at CDC who led the research. “But when you present the hard numbers, you start to see the profoundness of the problem.” Her message: To protect your health, do everything you can to quit
  • Smoke Away understands that smoking is something that is not easy to “just quit” but we also know that with help, and will power, you can at least give it a go in 2009!
  • We spend an inordinate amount of time telling people, no, pleading with people to quit smoking either with the help of Smoke Away or without. The point being that is important for smokers to realize that quitting smoking is the name of the game because it kills you and it hurts others. With that in mind here are 11 thoughts and facts about second hand smoke you probably did not know,

  • Secondhand smoke has been classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a known cause of cancer in humans (Group A carcinogen).
  • Secondhand smoke exposure causes disease and premature death in children and adults who do not smoke. Secondhand smoke contains hundreds of chemicals known to be toxic or carcinogenic, including formaldehyde, benzene, vinyl chloride, arsenic ammonia and hydrogen cyanide.
  • Secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,400 lung cancer deaths and 22,700-69,600 heart disease deaths in adult nonsmokers in the United States each year.
  • Nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke at work are at increased risk for adverse health effects. Levels of secondhand smoke in restaurants and bars were found to be 2 to 5 times higher than in residences with smokers and 2 to 6 times higher than in office workplaces.
  • Since 1999, 70 percent of the U.S. workforce worked under a smoke-free policy, ranging from 83.9 percent in Utah to 48.7 percent in Nevada.  Workplace productivity was increased and absenteeism was decreased among former smokers compared with current smokers.
  • Eighteen states – Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, Washington and Vermont – as well as the District of Columbia prohibit smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. Montana and Utah prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants; bars will go smokefree in 2009. New Hampshire prohibits smoking in some public places, including all restaurants and bars. Four states – Florida, Idaho, Louisiana and Nevada – prohibit smoking in most public places and workplaces, including restaurants, but exempt stand-alone bars. Fifteen states partially or totally prevent (preempt) local communities from passing smokefree air ordinances stronger than the statewide law. Iowa, Nebraska and Oregon have passed legislation prohibiting smoking in almost all public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars, but the laws have not taken effect yet.
  • Secondhand smoke is especially harmful to young children. Secondhand smoke is responsible for between 150,000 and 300,000 lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children under 18 months of age, resulting in between 7,500 and 15,000 hospitalizations each year, and causes 430 sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) deaths in the United States annually.
  • Secondhand smoke exposure may cause buildup of fluid in the middle ear, resulting in 790,000 physician office visits per year.  Secondhand smoke can also aggravate symptoms in 400,000 to 1,000,000 children with asthma.
  • In the United States, 21 million, or 35 percent of, children live in homes where residents or visitors smoke in the home on a regular basis. Approximately 50-75 percent of children in the United States have detectable levels of cotinine, the breakdown product of nicotine in the blood.
  • Research indicates that private research conducted by cigarette company Philip Morris in the 1980s showed that secondhand smoke was highly toxic, yet the company suppressed the finding during the next two decades.
  • The current Surgeon General’s Report concluded that scientific evidence indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Short exposures to secondhand smoke can cause blood platelets to become stickier, damage the lining of blood vessels, decrease coronary flow velocity reserves, and reduce heart rate variability, potentially increasing the risk of heart attack.
  • A key mechanism by which smoking triggers genetic changes that cause lung cancer has been unravelled.

    Researchers have shown exposure to cigarette smoke slows production of a protein called FANCD2 in lung cells.

    This protein plays a key role in repairing damage to DNA, and causing faulty cells to commit suicide before they go on to become cancerous.

    The study, led by Oregon Health and Science University, appears in the British Journal of Cancer.

    LUNG CANCER
    Most common cancer in the world with 1.3 million people diagnosed every year
    Second most common form of cancer in the UK after breast cancer
    Over 38,300 new cases, and more than 33,000 deaths in the UK each year
    Smoking responsible for 90% of cases in the UK

    It raises hopes of improved treatments for the disease.

    Lead researcher Dr Laura Hays said: “These findings show the important role FANCD2 plays in protecting lung cells against cigarette smoke and may explain why cigarette smoke is so toxic to these cells.”

    The researchers suspect other proteins also play a role in fixing DNA and weeding out defective cells.

    However, their work showed that cells with very high levels of FANCD2 were resistant to the toxic effects of smoke – suggesting this protein is key.

    Artificial windpipe

    The researchers created an artificial windpipe in the lab to replicate the environment of a smoker’s lung.

    They then studied the effects of cigarette smoke on different proteins in cells and found that FANCD2 levels were low enough to allow DNA damage.

    FANCD2 is part of a family of proteins involved in an inherited condition called Fanconi anaemia.

    People with the condition are more likely to develop cancers at a young age and have low levels of these proteins.

    Dr Lesley Walker, director of cancer information at Cancer Research UK, said: “This interesting piece of science adds to our understanding of why smoking is so deadly.

    “Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer and causes nine out of ten cases of lung cancer.

    “But the good news is that quitting works – after five years without smoking your risk of a heart attack will have fallen to half that of a smoker.

    “And after ten years your risk of lung cancer will have halved too.”

    So quit smoking! Why not quit smoking? What are the triggers that are causing you to continue to smoke? If we can ID those triggers, then the makers of Smoke Away believe that you’re well on your way to heading down the path of a successful quit. Check in with our users over at Smoke Away Support for even more tips and advice on how to quit smoking, whether you use our product or not. Just quit.

    Childhood cancer survivors who are most likely to develop tumours as adults continue to endanger their health by smoking, research suggests.

    A University of Birmingham(England) team found the highest smoking rates among patients whose type of treatment put them at greater risk later in life.

    Cancer campaigners have expressed concern that the survivors are exposing themselves to “avoidable” dangers.

    The researchers say more education is needed about the risks of smoking.

    We are very concerned that people are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer
    Professor Mike Hawkins
    Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies

    The study, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, pinpoints three types of childhood cancer – Hodgkin’s lymphoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Wilms’ tumour – which are known to carry an increased risk of further tumours due to the form of radiotherapy and chemotherapy used to treat them.

    The researchers found that smoking was most common among people who had been treated for these cancers when children – nearly a quarter of the 10,000 former cancer sufferers surveyed.

    Overall, childhood cancer survivors are around half as likely as the general population to be regular smokers.

    Intervention call

    Researcher Dr Clare Frobisher, based at Birmingham’s Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “It is worrying that those survivors who are most at risk of developing a new cancer as a result of their treatment, are more likely to be smokers than other childhood cancer survivors.

    INCREASED RISK
    A study of 16,541 survivors of childhood cancer found they were 6.2 times more likely to develop a second primary tumour than the general population
    After 25 years 4.2% of survivors had developed a second primary cancer
    The rate of second primary tumours among survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma was 9.2 times that of the general population, for Wilms’ tumour it was 6.9 times, and for soft tissue sarcoma it was 4.3 times
    Figures from the Centre for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies

    “It is clear that more work needs to be done to make sure they are aware of their increased risk of a second cancer and other related health problems if they smoke.”

    The majority of smokers in the study took up smoking before the age of 20.

    Dr Frobisher said: “We think intervention programmes should be put in place early, targeting cancer survivors as young as 12.”

    Professor Mike Hawkins, director of the Centre for Childhoold Cancer Survivor Studies, said: “We are very concerned that people who have been exposed to radiation and chemotherapy drugs during treatment for cancer as a child are exposing themselves to a further completely avoidable risk for developing another cancer and other smoking-related diseases in later life.”

    Elspeth Lee, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said it was crucial that young cancer survivors were given all the necessary information and support to discourage tem for taking up smoking.

    Thanks to the development of better treatments for childhood cancer, almost eight in ten children now survive a diagnosis of the disease.

    It is estimated that there are more than 26,000 survivors of childhood cancer alive in Britain today.

    It is estimated that in the UK around 11 million adults – more than one in five of the population – smoke.

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of cancer in the UK. It is responsible for nearly nine out of ten cases of lung cancer in the UK. With that being said, The makers of Smoke Away would like to stress that they want you to quit smoking, it does not matter how you do it just quit, whether its with our product or someone else’s.

     

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 44.5 million US adults were current smokers in 2006 (the most recent year for which numbers are available). This is 20.8% of all adults (23.9% of men, 18.0% of women) — more than 1 out of 5 people.

    When broken down by race/ethnicity, the numbers were as follows:

    Whites 21.9%
    African Americans 23.0%
    Hispanics 15.2%
    American Indians/Alaska Natives 32.4%
    Asian Americans 10.4%

    The numbers were higher in younger age groups. In 2006, CDC reported almost 24% of those 18 to 44 years old were current smokers, compared to 10.2% in those aged 65 or older.

    Nationwide, 22.3% of high school students and 8.1% of middle school students were smoking in 2004. More White and Hispanic students smoked cigarettes.  Can anyone tell me why the highest percentages would among American Indians and native Alaskans?

    Listen, as long as you’re sitting there wondering who smokes, why don’t you, if you smoke check out Smoke Away, or if you don’t but have a friend or loved one that smokes, steer them towards Smoke Away? What do you have to lose? Besides that craving to smoke?

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A law extending a smoking ban in Turkey to most enclosed areas — including taxis, ferries and shopping malls — came into effect Monday in the nicotine-addicted nation.

    As of midnight, outdoor smoking was also banned in locations such as stadiums and playgrounds. A ban on lighting up in bars, restaurants and coffeehouses will be implemented next year.

    Smoking was already barred on buses and airplanes and in larger offices. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s Islamic-rooted government expanded the ban to most enclosed places as part of an attempt to reduce smoking rates in the country and the effects of second-hand smoke.

    Around 40 percent of Turks over the age of 15 are smokers, consuming around 17 million packs a day, according to Yesilay, an organization devoted to fighting alcohol, drug and tobacco abuse.

    The government says around 160,000 people die annually in Turkey from smoking-related ailments.

    The law, passed by Parliament in March, calls for a fine of 50 Turkish lira (about $40) for people who light up in smoke-free areas.

    But enforcing smoking bans has in the past been difficult and it is not unusual to see people lighting up next to no-smoking signs in public places.

    Taxi driver Huseyin Erdogan, who is not related to the prime minister, says he does not think the bans will help him get off cigarettes.

    “I don’t know how much of a deterrent these laws will be,” he said. “I cannot quit smoking, I’ll only quit when I go to my grave. I have to smoke.”

    According to the World Health Organization, nearly two-thirds of the world’s smokers live in 10 countries led by China and India and followed by Indonesia, Russia, the U.S., Japan, Brazil, Bangladesh, Germany and Turkey.

    Turkey is also among the world’s main tobacco growers along with China, India, the U.S. and Brazil, and one of the top exporters. Several major cigarette producers blend Turkish tobacco in their products.

    “To smoke like a Turk” is a common expression in many European countries to describe someone who smokes a lot, and hookah smoking — a legacy of the Ottoman era — has experienced a revival with several hookah cafes opening up in major Turkish cities over the past decade.

    I wonder if this latest news was created by Big Tobacco?

    A study by an award-winning cancer expert shows that cell phone use could kill more people than smoking, it is reported.

    According to the U.K.’s Independent newspaper, the study, headed by Dr. Vini Khurana, shows that there is a growing body of evidence that using handsets for 10 years or more can double the risk of brain cancer.

    Khurana — one of the world’s top neurosurgeons — based his assessment on the fact that three billion people now use the phones worldwide. That is three times higher than people who smoke. Smoking kills some five million globally each year.

    He warned that people should avoid using handsets whenever possible and called on the phone industry to make them safer. France and Germany have already warned against the use of mobile phones, especially by children, it is reported.

    The study is said to be the most damning indictment of cell phone use. According to the Independent, cancers take at least 10 years to develop, which has influenced earlier cancer studies showing relative safety when using cell phones.

     

    “Earlier this year, the French government warned against the use of mobile phones, especially by children. Germany also advises its people to minimise handset use, and the European Environment Agency has called for exposures to be reduced.

    Professor Khurana – a top neurosurgeon who has received 14 awards over the past 16 years, has published more than three dozen scientific papers – reviewed more than 100 studies on the effects of mobile phones. He has put the results on a brain surgery website, and a paper based on the research is currently being peer-reviewed for publication in a scientific journal.

    He admits that mobiles can save lives in emergencies, but concludes that “there is a significant and increasing body of evidence for a link between mobile phone usage and certain brain tumours”. He believes this will be “definitively proven” in the next decade.

    Noting that malignant brain tumours represent “a life-ending diagnosis”, he adds: “We are currently experiencing a reactively unchecked and dangerous situation.” He fears that “unless the industry and governments take immediate and decisive steps”, the incidence of malignant brain tumours and associated death rate will be observed to rise globally within a decade from now, by which time it may be far too late to intervene medically.

    “It is anticipated that this danger has far broader public health ramifications than asbestos and smoking,” says Professor Khurana, who told the IoS his assessment is partly based on the fact that three billion people now use the phones worldwide, three times as many as smoke. Smoking kills some five million worldwide each year, and exposure to asbestos is responsible for as many deaths in Britain as road accidents.

    Late last week, the Mobile Operators Association dismissed Khurana’s study as “a selective discussion of scientific literature by one individual”. It believes he “does not present a balanced analysis” of the published science, and “reaches opposite conclusions to the WHO and more than 30 other independent expert scientific reviews”.

    Reading news like this almost gives smokers a new reason to keep smoking. Or better yet, why don’t they just smoke and talk on their cell phones at the same time? Listen, if you are serious about quitting smoking, then why not at least try something, anything. The makers of Smoke Away would love for you to use their product, but if you don’t, thats ok. Just quit smoking!

    Despite the well-known dangers of tobacco, more than a billion people worldwide still smoke cigarettes. On Thursday, in its first report on global tobacco use and control efforts, the World Health Organization helped shed light on why the number of smokers remains so high. Though tobacco is the world’s leading preventable cause of death—killing an estimated 5.4 million people a year (more than tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria combined)—the WHO report found that, while 152 countries have pledged to implement recommended tobacco-control policies, only a handful have taken strong action already. Governments around the world still take in, on average, more than 500 times as much from tobacco taxes as they spend on tobacco control.

    —can governments help turn the tide?

    The makers of Smoke Away would like to drive the point home visually for those of you out there who just don’t get it. So we start by saying, “What the hell is your problem?” Are you the type of person that reads something like this and says,”Hmmm, that’s not a bad idea!”

    dont_quit_smoking.jpg

    Or maybe this looks really sexy to you and makes your mouth water at the prospect of puttting another cancer stick in your mouth?

    ciggs.jpg

    mmmm.. yummy isn’t it? or perhaps you are the type of person where one of these phrases makes sense to you? What is it going to take to get through to you?

    quit_smoking1.jpg

    Ohhhh ok we get it, you don’t think there’s really anything bad in a cigarette other than the nicotine…OK then don’t worry about the butane, the cadmium, the stearic acid, the industrial solvent, the insecticide and the toilet cleaner, the vinegar, the sewer gas, the arsenic, the carbon monoxide, and the rocket fuel that is in each and every cigarette.

    cigarette.jpg

    But what are a couple of cigarettes going to do to me? Well lets look at the anatomy of your typical female. Now keep in mind, cigarettes are not choosy, they’ll poison and pounce on anyone who chooses to light up. But lets look shall we?

    smokequit.gif

    Starting from the head on down we have wrinkles, the inability to smell properly, bad breath, yellow teeth, the inability to taste correctly, gum disease,  a persistent hacking cough, a nice persistent back ache, more fat, the inability to go to the bathroom properly, lower chance of  having a child, and slower wound healing. Mmm.. makes you want to run right out and smoke doesn’t it?

    Lastly lets look at some quick statistics of just what cigarettes and second hand smoke and its ilk do to people. Choose to pick your poison?

    quit_smoking_smoke_away.gif

    Listen, we don’t care HOW you quit smoking. In fact, the makers of Smoke Away would love for you to use our product, but more importantly, we want you to quit smoking using ANY product. Just quit. Not for us, for you, your family and your friends. If you want to talk to some people that have stopped smoking using our product, or people that are still in the throws of quitting, or people who have just plain quit, Try the Smoke Away Support site. Good Luck.

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