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Guess what?  Britney Spears  isn’t a fan of cigarette smoke — or any other kind of smoke, for that matter — while she’s performing. How about that? A celebrity saying smoking isn’t cool!

The 27-year-old pop star left the stage for about 30 minutes during a concert in Vancouver on Wednesday night, apparently because of smoke in the audience.

According to The Vancouver Sun, Spears’ concert was halted about 15 minutes into her performance, and an announcer told concertgoers to put out their cigarettes. Some audience members grew impatient while waiting for Spears and her troupe to return to the stage, the Sun reported.

After she returned and ended the show, Spears — who has been to rehab and is on the comeback trail after a long stretch of troubles — told the crowd, “Don’t smoke cigarettes or weed for that matter.”

Spears could really spear-head a movement here if she wanted. Just telling kids that smoking can kill would be a good start. For more info on how to quit smoking, check out Smoke Away

Larry Jukes said he remembers when he could buy 10 cigarette packs for $2.50.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he's upset about the hike but doesn't expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he’s upset about the hike but doesn’t expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

But he’d now take the days when — just last month — he could buy his carton of choice for $49.

Thanks in part to the largest-ever federal cigarette tax increase — a nearly 62-cents-a-pack hike that starts Wednesday but was reflected in many prices earlier — Jukes on Tuesday paid more than $58 for a 10-pack carton at the Cigarette Store in Denver, Colorado.

That same store was selling it about $9 cheaper weeks ago. Jukes and other shoppers there said they feel stuck and taken advantage of.

“They’re picking on us poor people, the ones that smoke,” Jukes, a 65-year-old who has been smoking since he was a teen, said of the government. “They have been for years.” Video Watch Jukes argue smokers are unfairly targeted »

The cigarette excise tax that tobacco companies must pay the federal government rose Wednesday by 61.6 cents per pack, or $6.16 per carton. The tax now comes to about $10.10 per carton, or $1.01 per pack.

But major tobacco companies began incorporating that increase into their prices to wholesalers in March. And the companies, wholesalers and retailers in many cases gave prices a boost beyond the tax increase, in part to make up for an expected drop in sales caused by the hike, some of them said.

“We don’t anticipate another raise for Wednesday. The [March increase in prices] was the raise,” said Mary Szarmach, vice president at Colorado-based Cigarette Store Corp., which operates 85 stores in five states. “The manufacturers took what they needed beyond [the tax increase] to maintain their profit margin and take care of what they think will be diminishing sales. …

“And to maintain gross profit margin, retailers in general tacked on a little, too.” Video Watch how and why the tax hike was instituted »

If the increase does scare off customers, 83-year-old Gloria Egger isn’t likely to be one of them, she said. She said she’s upset at the government for raising the tax, but Egger, who has been smoking since she was 18, isn’t likely to quit. iReport.com: Share your thoughts on the tobacco tax increase

“I think it’s ridiculous. … They’re picking on smokers,” Egger said at the Denver store, where she bought two cartons Tuesday. “I think they’re trying to run the tobacco companies out of business.

“As old as I am, I’m not going to quit smoking, regardless of what they do.” See other reactions to the tax hike »

Federal taxes also are going up Wednesday on other tobacco products, including cigars. Federal per-cigar taxes, which vary based on weight and price, used to be capped at 4.9 cents but now are capped at 40.26 cents.

The tobacco tax hikes, which President Obama signed into law in February, will be used to finance an expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP. The expansion, which will cost $35 million over five years, is expected to secure federally funded health care for an additional 4 million children.

Before the expansion, SCHIP covered almost 7 million children whose parents earn too much to qualify for Medicaid — the federal health insurance program for the poor — but can’t afford private insurance.

Dave Bowersox, who bought a box of Prime Time Little Cigars at the Denver store Tuesday, said he’s fine with the tobacco tax increases.

“I think tobacco, alcohol, that kind of stuff should be taxed instead of gasoline and food — things that are necessary for people to survive,” Bowersox said.

But near Orlando, Florida, cigar smoker Leah Fuller called the hikes “ridiculous.”

“There are [other] things that you could be targeting in the U.S. right now. Why the tobacco industry?” Fuller said. “I, personally, smoke cigars to relax. Why am I being punished for it?”

Jeff Borysiewicz, founder of Orlando-based Corona Cigar Co., said he believed the federal tax hike will cause cigar sales to drop. And he said the increase comes as Florida is considering a $1-per-cigar state tax hike. iReporters debate whether the change in price is fair »

Cigarettes, too, have been hit by state excise tax increases. Since January 2002, the average state cigarette tax has increased from 43 cents per pack to $1.21 per pack, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

A conservative estimate for the average per-pack cigarette price in the U.S., based on data collected from states and territories at the end of 2008 and adjusted for the federal tax increase, is $4.80, the group’s Eric Lindblom said.

Tobacco company Philip Morris USA raised list prices for its major brands by about 71 cents per pack last month “in direct response to the tax increase,” said Bill Phelps, spokesman for Philip Morris’ parent company, Altria.

RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co. on March 16 raised its cigarettes’ list prices by 41 to 44 cents per pack and, in many cases, reduced discounts to retailers, basically keeping “our pricing in line with the competition,” spokesman David Howard said.

“The federal tax increase was the primary driver,” Howard said.

Both companies said they expect a decrease in sales, with Howard noting industry analysts have estimated a drop of 6 percent to 8 percent. One factor in Philip Morris’ decision to increase list prices beyond the tax hike was the company’s expectation that the new tax level will decrease sales, Phelps said.

Not all U.S. sales declines would be due to smokers quitting, Phelps said.

“Tax increases create an incentive for people to bring cigarettes into the country illegally — [from places] where they don’t have to pay that higher tax,” Phelps said.

Nick Hamad, a tobacco store owner in Seattle, Washington, said he thinks the tax will ruin the American tobacco industry.

“If we lose the sales, the state will lose the revenue,” he said. “We will be hurt, the state will be hurt and eventually the consumers are being hurt.”

As for Jukes, higher prices probably won’t force him to quit smoking, he said.

“I’ve been smoking about 50 years,” Jukes said to which the makers of Smoke Away say, “should anyone have any sympathy for Jukes or other smokers for that matter? The answer is No. And if you want to quit smoking, then a good first step is to contact the makers of Smoke Away on their site or call 1-800-611-5930

Being severely obese is as hazardous to health as a lifetime of smoking, shortening life by a decade, a group of Oxford University experts has warned.

Even moderate obesity cuts life expectancy by about three years, says the Clinical Trial Service Unit.

The findings, published in The Lancet, come from data on almost a million people from around the world.

In the UK, a quarter of adults are now considered obese, with a body mass index (BMI) above 30.

BMI is useful for assessing the extent to which fatty tissue causes ill health.

If you are becoming overweight or obese, avoiding further weight gain could well add years to your life
Dr Gary Whitlock of Oxford University

It is calculated by dividing a person’s weight by their height.

Each incremental rise in BMI above the healthy zone of 20-25 increased premature death risk, the Clinical Trial Service Unit concluded.

Much of the obesity-related risk is down to heart disease and stroke, and to a lesser extent cancer.

Amongst middle-aged people in the UK, as many as one in four deaths from heart attack or stroke and one in 16 cancer deaths are due to being overweight or obese, the researchers estimate.

Fat at 40

In adult life, it may be easier to avoid substantial weight gain than to lose that weight once it has been gained, they say.

And avoiding middle age spread could add years to life.

Professor Peter Weissberg of the British Heart Foundation, which supported the work, said: “This is the latest and most convincing demonstration of the close relationship between being overweight and poor heart health, and confirms that smoking is harmful regardless of your weight.

“We all have a role to play in maintaining a healthy weight ourselves, but this study emphasises the importance of public health measures, such as the recently launched Change 4 Life campaign, as part of a raft of Government initiatives that will be needed to reduce the nation’s weight.”

Epidemiologist Dr Gary Whitlock of Oxford University, who led the analysis, said: ”Excess weight shortens human lifespan.

“In countries like Britain and America, weighing a third more than the optimum shortens lifespan by about three years.

“For most people, a third more than the optimum means carrying 20 to 30kg of excess weight. If you are becoming overweight or obese, avoiding further weight gain could well add years to your life.”

Sara Hiom of Cancer Research UK said: “Moderate obesity is becoming worryingly common in the UK and these factors combined are great cause for concern.

“We can eat less and move more to reduce weight. But smoking remains the single most significant cause of cancer death – and stopping smoking works.”

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, president of the UK Faculty of Public Health, said: “Being obese not only shortens life, it also leads to chronic ill-health – diabetes, high blood pressure, gallstones, back and joint troubles. My advice is don’t let it creep up on you.

“Cut down the fat in your food and use every opportunity to be more physical.”

The makers of Smoke Away could not agree more!

  1. What are the effects of cigarette smoking on cancer rates?
  2. Cigarette smoking causes 87 percent of lung cancer deaths . Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women . Smoking is also responsible for most cancers of the larynx, oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, and bladder. In addition, it is a cause of kidney, pancreatic, cervical, and stomach cancers, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.

  3. Are there any health risks for nonsmokers?
  4. The health risks caused by cigarette smoking are not limited to smokers. Exposure to secondhand smoke, or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), significantly increases the risk of lung cancer and heart disease in nonsmokers, as well as several respiratory illnesses in young children. (Secondhand smoke is a combination of the smoke that is released from the end of a burning cigarette and the smoke exhaled from the lungs of smokers.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s National Toxicology Program, and the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have all classified secondhand smoke as a known human carcinogen—a category reserved for agents for which there is sufficient scientific evidence that they cause cancer. The U.S. EPA has estimated that exposure to secondhand smoke causes about 3,000 lung cancer deaths among nonsmokers and is responsible for up to 300,000 cases of lower respiratory tract infections in children up to 18 months of age in the United States each year.

  5. What harmful chemicals are found in cigarette smoke?
  6. Cigarette smoke contains about 4,000 chemical agents, including over 60 carcinogens. In addition, many of these substances, such as carbon monoxide, tar, arsenic, and lead, are poisonous and toxic to the human body. Nicotine is a drug that is naturally present in the tobacco plant and is primarily responsible for a person’s addiction to tobacco products, including cigarettes. During smoking, nicotine is absorbed quickly into the bloodstream and travels to the brain in a matter of seconds. Nicotine causes addiction to cigarettes and other tobacco products that is similar to the addiction produced by using heroin and cocaine.

  7. How does exposure to tobacco smoke affect the cigarette smoker?
  8. Smoking harms nearly every major organ of the body. The risk of developing smoking-related diseases, such as lung and other cancers, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory illnesses, increases with total lifetime exposure to cigarette smoke. This includes the number of cigarettes a person smokes each day, the intensity of smoking (i.e., the size and frequency of puffs), the age at which smoking began, the number of years a person has smoked, and a smoker’s secondhand smoke exposure.

  9. How would quitting smoking affect the risk of developing cancer and other diseases?
  10. Smoking cessation has major and immediate health benefits for men and women of all ages. Quitting smoking decreases the risk of lung and other cancers, heart attack, stroke, and chronic lung disease. The earlier a person quits, the greater the health benefit. For example, research has shown that people who quit before age 50 reduce their risk of dying in the next 15 years by half compared with those who continue to smoke. Smoking low-yield cigarettes, as compared to cigarettes with higher tar and nicotine, provides no clear benefit to health. For additional information on quitting smoking, why not check out the Smoke Away website?

The makers of Smoke Away are not one to promote other products but this site is pretty cool. EX is a free quit plan that will help you stop smoking. It’s not about why to quit, it’s all about HOW. Created by medical experts and tested by real smokers.

ex

Overheard from a smoker:

“It’s got little rings around it in a couple of spots,”

The rings? They are thick bands of low-permeability paper, and they are rapidly appearing on cigarettes across the country. The idea being if you set down your cigarette — or fall asleep in bed while its still lit— the cigarette will go out when the ash reaches one of the rings.

In effect, the rings act as caution tape. To keep a cigarette lit, you have to keep puffing. When you stop, it goes out by itself in about 5 minutes.  It doesn’t really cut down on smoking now does it?

Fire and public health folks think the cigarettes are a good idea — so good that in the last six years, 37 states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws requiring that they be sold; in five other states, such laws are under consideration or await the governor’s signature.

There are no reliable statistical data demonstrating that fire-safe cigarette laws actually reduce fires though.

Fire and public safety officials do point to research conducted by the Harvard University School of Public Health, which found that only 10 percent of cigarettes sold in New York, the first state to enact a safer cigarette law, burned down to the filter if left unattended, compared to 99.8 percent of cigarettes without the bands.

Common sense dictates that cigarette are less likely to cause fires if they snuff themselves out, advocates say, meaning fewer deaths, injuries and property loss.

The new smokes ‘taste like crap’-
Good, maybe that will motivate you to quit the nasty habit in the first place! Side by side with a traditional cigarette, you can’t tell much difference. But on the box, the letters FSC above the bar code denote Fire Safe Cigarettes; in some states, it’s RFP for Reduced Fire Propensity. 

“I do understand why they did it, as a safety precaution,” said one woman, But there’s one big problem, she said: “The cigarettes don’t taste near as good as they used to.” Can I get an amen?

And that’s the rub. Asked to rate the new cigarettes, many smokers said they left an unpleasant coppery taste in the mouth. Can I get another amen?

“It’s nasty,” said another man, they “taste like crap.” One more amen please!

And for many smokers, the  feature that fire officials like is a pain in the neck.“They constantly go out, and I have to relight them all the time,” said a woman from Texas. Do you fell sorry for her?

New York kicked off the movement 4½ years ago, when it became the first state to require tobacco companies to make the self-extinguishing cigarettes. As the laws have spread across the land, many smokers have driven to neighboring states to get their smokes. That’s what happened in Kentucky after its law went into effect in April 2008.

That may not be an option for long, though, whether or not the 13 states without fire-safe cigarettes laws fall into line: With the tide firmly against them, the tobacco companies, which initially opposed the laws, now say it is too much trouble to make different cigarettes for different states. As a result, they predicted that by Jan. 1, 2010, all cigarettes sold in stores in the United States will be self-extinguishing.


Which is why some smokers give special thanks for the Internet.

They are turning to online sites like FSCCigarettes.com, which complains: “It’s kind of BS that we the smokers have to put up with more unnecessary and probably unhealthy additive being added to our smokes (That we pay good money for by the way) just because some junkies can’t properly extinguish there [sic] cigarettes.”

And they are venting on online forums like one run by the Smokers Club, which argues that “there is no end to the fictions nicotine ninnies will create to justify their venomous hatred of smokers.”

One poster on the site wrote that if you believe fire-safe cigarettes are safer than traditional cigarettes, “you might want to have your doctor check to see if you still have a brain.”

Meanwhile, a group calling itself Citizens Against Fire Safe Cigarettes said it had collected more than 1,600 signatures on an online petition seeking to repeal fire-safe cigarette laws. Last week, the organization put out a call on its blog for “crucial support from a Scientist with a PH.D. and/or a medical doctor who is willing to come forward and offer their support.”

In a posting on the group’s online forum, a Texas woman wrote that “the new chemicals are making me very ill, and quitting is harder than I ever imagined.”

“It’s time for the government to take responsibility for the bad decisions they have made,” she added. “They used smokers as guinea pigs, and now they expect us to roll over and drop dead.”

With that being said, why complain about your rights as a smoker and become a non-smoker? It’s why we created Smoke Away, to help you quit!

According to recent studies, the only thing cooling about menthol cigarettes may be the name at most.  The “menthol flavor” may make them even more addictive and deadlier to smokers.

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“We previously found that menthol cigarette smokers take in more nicotine and carbon monoxide per cigarette. This study shows that menthol smokers also find it harder to quit, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day,” study author Kunal Gandhi, a researcher in the division of addiction psychiatry at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyRobert Wood Johnson Medical School, said in a news release issued by the school.

In the study, which examined almost 1,700 people attending a university-run tobacco addiction clinic, blacks and Latinos who smoked menthol cigarettes had a notably harder time quitting than those smoking non-menthols. Blacks who smoked menthols, for example, had half the success in quitting as blacks using non-menthol cigarettes.

“These results build on growing evidence suggesting that menthol is not a neutral flavoring in cigarettes. It masks the harshness of the nicotine and toxins, affects the way the cigarette is smoked, and makes it more deadly and addictive,”  said Jonathan Foulds, director of the university’s Tobacco Dependence Program.

Though the makers of Smoke Away would love for you to quit smoking, they realize that in the end, the choice is entirely up to you. For more information on how to quit smoking, Log onto the Smoke Away Support site.

As if you need to add to the long list of reasons to quit smoking for good, new research from  the journal of Neurology suggests a family history of stroke makes smokers six times more likely to also suffer a stroke. The specific type of aneurysm, called a subarachnoid hemorrhage, is fatal in approximately 35 to 40 percent of cases, and that’s not cool.

 Smoking Cessation

Video: Smoking Cessation

Sounds plenty unappealing, but a nicotine addiction can be as enslaving as heroin. Recent reporting by U.S. News found that going cold turkey—while the most common approach wannabe quitters attempt—is almost always doomed to fail. Smokers who successfully quit tend to recruit multiple resources—and sometimes more than one resource at a time—experts say. From support groups to online smoking cessation help to prescription medications and hypnotism, drawing on a range of options to become a former smoker seems to your best bet.

Occasional smokers are not free of potential damage. A lighter habit—even one that burns through less than a pack a week—can inflict early cardiovascular disease on otherwise healthy young adults.

So, in 2009, the makers of Smoke Away only wish you the best of luck and the happiest of new year’s when you finally end up quitting the nastiest of habits!

Despite progress in establishing clean indoor air policies, 42 percent of U.S. children are still exposed to secondhand smoke each week, according to a new survey. Secondhand smoke increases childrens risk of developing asthma, ear infections and cavities and increases infants’ risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Among the other major findings from the Social Climate Survey of Tobacco:

  • Seventy-five percent of American households forbid smoking in the home and car, but children in one-quarter of U.S. families aren’t protected from secondhand smoke.
  • Among parents who smoke, only 53.5 percent prohibit smoking in the home and only 22.5 percent forbid smoking in the family vehicle.
  • More nonsmokers than smokers prohibit smoking in their home.
  • More than 25 percent of smokers report that children have been exposed to smoke in their home.
  • About 8.1 percent of U.S. parents report that their child has been exposed to secondhand smoke in an indoor public place in the past seven days.

The survey was released this week by the American Legacy Foundation, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and researchers from Mississippi State University.

“Children especially deserve smoke-free environments, and all public places where children eat and play should be protected from secondhand smoke,” Dr. Jonathan Klein, director of the American Academy of Pediatrics Julius B. Richmond Center for Excellence, said in an AAP news release. “Adults have the power to make healthier decisions for their children, and there needs to be more done to protect children in homes and cars from the dangers of secondhand smoke.”

“The effects of secondhand smoke are serious and should not be minimized,” added Cheryl G. Healton, president and CEO of the American Legacy Foundation, which is dedicated to reducing tobacco use in the United States.

“Addressing this issue starts with helping adult smokers and parents quit. Most know they are dealing with a tough addiction, so pediatricians and others can provide the tools and resources for parents to re-learn their life without cigarettes,” Healton said in the news release.

As we head towards closing out 2008, don’t you owe it to your children to quit smoking? Or to at least try and attempt to stop smoking? The makers of Smoke Away realize this. Don’t quit for our sake, quit smoking for the sake of the children living under your roof.

Lets get right to it!

  1.  You could have a higher rate of infections In October, the federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made its first ever recommendation that all smokers ages 19 to 64 be added to a short list of candidates for the pneumococcal vaccine. That’s because there are very strong data showing that the risk of infection by pneumonia-causing bacteria is substantially greater for smokers than for nonsmokers. 
  2.  Diabetes anyone? As if we need any more risk factors for diabetes, an analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association last year found that across 25 prior studies, current smokers have a 44 percent greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers do, and the risk was strongest for those with the heaviest habit, who clocked 20 or more cigarettes per day. In an accompanying editorial, researchers made a striking estimation: That some 12 percent of all type 2 diabetes cases nationwide might be attributable to smoking.
  3. It clouds judgement Smoking may cloud the mind, according to accumulating research. A June study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that smoking in middle age is linked to memory problems and to a slide in reasoning abilities, though these risks appeared lessened for those who’d long quit; this is important, the authors wrote, because other research has shown that people with mild cognitive impairment in midlife develop dementia at an accelerated rate. Their report piggybacks on several focused on the older set: A 2007 analysis of 19 prior studies concluded that elderly smokers face a heightened risk of dementia and cognitive decline, compared with lifelong nonsmokers. And in 2004, researchers reported in Ne urology that smoking appeared to hasten cognitive decline in dementia-free elderly smokers, bringing it on several times faster than in their nonsmoking peers.
  4. Forget a robust sex life. If men want to hop aboard the Viagra bandwagon, mounting evidence suggests that puffing cigarettes might be just their ticket. Smokers are more apt to experience erectile dysfunction than nonsmokers are, and this risk climbs as the number of cigarettes smoked increases. A study in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2007 tracked more than 7,500 Chinese men with low risk for artherosclerosis, a chief underlying cause of erectile dysfunction, and found that smoking could independently hike a man’s chance of wrangling with the sexual condition. Preventing smoking is an “important approach” for cutting the risk of ED, the researchers concluded.
  5. If you’re 30, you’ll look 50 everywhere. Not only does smoking contribute to premature facial wrinkles, but a 2007 study in the Archives of Dermatology found that it may also lead to wrinkling of skin that rarely sees the light of day—in areas such as the inner arm and perhaps the buttocks.
  6. Menopause at an early age?. Women who smoke face an increased risk of infertility, and they may experience natural menopause at a younger age than do nonsmokers, according to the 2004 and the 2001 Surgeon General’s Reports, respectively. Further evidence: A 2001 animal study in Nature Genetics found that chemicals in cigarette smoke can hurry menopause by killing off egg cells made by ovaries, thereby dwindling the egg cell reserve. Since the timing of menopause is dictated by the size of a woman’s egg cell reserve—which is stocked with about a million eggs at birth and vanishes by menopause—anything that speeds up its loss could logically lead to a much earlier onset of fertility troubles, notes Jonathan Tilly, one of the study’s authors and director of the Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital. More worrisome: Women who smoke during pregnancy may be compromising not only their own future fertility but the fertility of their unborn daughters. In studies testing that idea, mice exposed to chemicals in cigarette smoke during gestation were born with shrunken egg reserves. “Even under the best-chance scenario—you’re a nonsmoker, you’re healthy, you’re young, you eat well, you’re in shape—human fertility isn’t 100 percent,” says Tilly. “Anything you can do to make it better is certainly worth your while.”
  7. Time to wear the cheater glasses. Several studies have found a robust link between smoking and eye disease, specifically age-related macular degeneration, which can permanently blur vision or cause blindness. A 2005 review of 17 studies in the journal Eye reported that active smokers may face two to three times the risk for developing the disease experienced by those who have never smoked.
  8.  Weak bones, brittle bones. Smoking weakens the body’s scaffolding and is a serious risk factor for osteoporosis, according to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. It’s been shown to fritter away bone density in postmenopausal women and to hike the risk of hip fractures in both sexes, according to the 2004 Surgeon General’s Report. (People who endure hip fractures are 12 to 20 percent more likely to die than those who don’t, the Report notes, though there are ways osteoporosis sufferers can protect themselves.) Smokers may also experience slower healing of broken bones and wounded tissues than do nonsmokers.
  9. It roughs up your innards. Sure, cigarettes may be smooth to inhale, but they can rough up the digestive system, leading to heartburn, peptic ulcers, and possibly gallstones, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. What’s more, current and former smokers have an elevated risk of developing Crohn’s disease, a condition characterized by inflammation in the digestive tract and causing pain and diarrhea, says NIDDK.
  10. Kiss your quality of life goodbye. Men who have never smoked live on average 10 years longer than their peers who smoke heavily, according to an October report in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Moreover, they enjoyed a higher quality of life throughout those extra years, throwing sand in the face of the old smokers’ defense that an early death is a small price to pay for a lifetime of pleasure . The study’s Finnish authors drew their conclusion after scrutinizing data on more than 1,600 men tracked for nearly 30 years.
  11. Bonus! Did you say cancer? Not to belabor the point, but tobacco use and smoking have been linked to much more than lung cancer. In September, the CDC released a report estimating that more than 2 million cases of tobacco-related cancers were diagnosed nationwide between 1999 and 2004. Lung and bronchial cancer topped the list, naturally, but other types included stomach, pancreatic, kidney, urinary bladder, and cervical cancer. “We knew this was a big problem and a preventable problem,” says Sherri Stewart, the epidemiologist at CDC who led the research. “But when you present the hard numbers, you start to see the profoundness of the problem.” Her message: To protect your health, do everything you can to quit
  • Smoke Away understands that smoking is something that is not easy to “just quit” but we also know that with help, and will power, you can at least give it a go in 2009!
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