According to The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Media campaigns that portray the tobacco industry in a negative light may be a powerful intervention to decrease young adult smoking, U.S. researchers said.

To determine attitudes, the researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, asked respondents how strongly they agreed or disagreed with three statements: Taking a stand against smoking is important to me; I want to be involved with efforts to get rid of cigarette smoking; and I would like to see cigarette companies go out of business.

The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found people who agreed with those statements and supported action against the tobacco industry were one-third as likely to be smokers as those who did not support action against the tobacco industry.

Among current smokers, those who had a negative attitude toward the tobacco industry were at least four times more likely to plan to quit smoking than smokers who did not support action against the tobacco industry.

“Running anti-tobacco ads to expose the fact that the tobacco industry kills five million people worldwide annually turns out to be hugely successful in preventing and promoting cessation,” study co-author Stanton Glantz, director of UCSF’s Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, said in a statement. “Other anti-smoking advertising campaigns have focused more on health hazards of smoking, rather than those including tobacco-industry denormalization messages.”

With that being said, the makers of Smoke Away would highly suggest checking out our product. You’re motivated and you’re ready. Now is the time to get with it!

We know, you know everything there is about the effects about cigarettes and smoking. Well, sometimes you need to be reminded what not quitting smoking can do to you. The makers of Smoke Away present for you 17 facts that you may or may not have know about smoking.

  1. Smoking-related diseases kill one in 10 adults globally, or cause four million deaths. If the same rate continues, by 2030 smoking will kill one in six people.
  2. About a third of the male adult global population smokes.
  3. Cigarette smoke  contains 11 chemical compounds that are known to cause cancer.
  4. Someone dies every eight seconds from tobacco use
  5. Every minute 10 million cigarettes are sold
  6. Among young teens (aged 13 to 15), about one in five smokes worldwide.
  7. Half of long-term smokers will die from tobacco. Every cigarette smoked cuts at least five minutes of life on average – about the time taken to smoke it.
  8. Smoking is the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death. It is a prime factor in heart disease, stroke and chronic lung disease. It can cause cancer of the lungs, larynx, esophagus, mouth, and bladder, and contributes to cancer of the cervix, pancreas, and kidneys.
  9. More than 4,000 toxic or carcinogenic chemicals have been found in tobacco smoke.
  10. Cigarette smoke contains benzene, carbon monoxide, arsenic, hydrogen cyanide and polonium 210.
  11. Tobacco is an addictive substance. Smokers who use other drugs such as heroin, methadone, amphetamines and barbiturates rate tobacco as their most addictive drug.
  12. At least a quarter of all deaths from heart diseases and about three-quarters of world’s chronic bronchitis are related to smoking.
  13. A 1998 survey found that tobacco companies were among the top 10 advertisers in 18 out of 66 countries surveyed.
  14. Through advertising, tobacco firms try to link smoking with athletic prowess, sexual attractiveness, success, adult sophistication, adventure and self-fulfillment
  15. Evidence shows that around 50% of those who start smoking in adolescent years go on to smoke for 15 to 20 years.
  16. Peer-reviewed studies show teenagers are heavily influenced by tobacco advertising.
  17. The tobacco industry has changed the way it advertises in the last 30 years. Now, only 10% of advertising expenditure goes to print and, outdoor ads, while more than half goes to promotional allowances and items, such as t-shirts for young people or lighters and key rings.

It’s up to you. Right now, do you want to keep smoking? Or continue to puff away? It’s your choice and Smoke Away is here to help you make the right decision.

Guess what?  Britney Spears  isn’t a fan of cigarette smoke — or any other kind of smoke, for that matter — while she’s performing. How about that? A celebrity saying smoking isn’t cool!

The 27-year-old pop star left the stage for about 30 minutes during a concert in Vancouver on Wednesday night, apparently because of smoke in the audience.

According to The Vancouver Sun, Spears’ concert was halted about 15 minutes into her performance, and an announcer told concertgoers to put out their cigarettes. Some audience members grew impatient while waiting for Spears and her troupe to return to the stage, the Sun reported.

After she returned and ended the show, Spears — who has been to rehab and is on the comeback trail after a long stretch of troubles — told the crowd, “Don’t smoke cigarettes or weed for that matter.”

Spears could really spear-head a movement here if she wanted. Just telling kids that smoking can kill would be a good start. For more info on how to quit smoking, check out Smoke Away

With people still insisting to smoke, even with some states threatening to raise the cost of cigarettes to, in some cases, $9 a pack, stop smoking PSA’s are a good way to remind people tha they should not smoke. With each video there is a slightly different message, but in all of them there is a consistent theme, and it is this: Smoking kills, and you need to quit smoking. Listen, the makers of Smoke Away want you to quit smoking. period, end of story!

Face it, if you smoke, you’re heading down the wrong path, and the only time it’s too late to quit, is when it’s too late.

Larry Jukes said he remembers when he could buy 10 cigarette packs for $2.50.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he's upset about the hike but doesn't expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

Coloradan Larry Jukes says he’s upset about the hike but doesn’t expect it will persuade him to quit smoking.

But he’d now take the days when — just last month — he could buy his carton of choice for $49.

Thanks in part to the largest-ever federal cigarette tax increase — a nearly 62-cents-a-pack hike that starts Wednesday but was reflected in many prices earlier — Jukes on Tuesday paid more than $58 for a 10-pack carton at the Cigarette Store in Denver, Colorado.

That same store was selling it about $9 cheaper weeks ago. Jukes and other shoppers there said they feel stuck and taken advantage of.

“They’re picking on us poor people, the ones that smoke,” Jukes, a 65-year-old who has been smoking since he was a teen, said of the government. “They have been for years.” Video Watch Jukes argue smokers are unfairly targeted »

The cigarette excise tax that tobacco companies must pay the federal government rose Wednesday by 61.6 cents per pack, or $6.16 per carton. The tax now comes to about $10.10 per carton, or $1.01 per pack.

But major tobacco companies began incorporating that increase into their prices to wholesalers in March. And the companies, wholesalers and retailers in many cases gave prices a boost beyond the tax increase, in part to make up for an expected drop in sales caused by the hike, some of them said.

“We don’t anticipate another raise for Wednesday. The [March increase in prices] was the raise,” said Mary Szarmach, vice president at Colorado-based Cigarette Store Corp., which operates 85 stores in five states. “The manufacturers took what they needed beyond [the tax increase] to maintain their profit margin and take care of what they think will be diminishing sales. …

“And to maintain gross profit margin, retailers in general tacked on a little, too.” Video Watch how and why the tax hike was instituted »

If the increase does scare off customers, 83-year-old Gloria Egger isn’t likely to be one of them, she said. She said she’s upset at the government for raising the tax, but Egger, who has been smoking since she was 18, isn’t likely to quit. iReport.com: Share your thoughts on the tobacco tax increase

“I think it’s ridiculous. … They’re picking on smokers,” Egger said at the Denver store, where she bought two cartons Tuesday. “I think they’re trying to run the tobacco companies out of business.

“As old as I am, I’m not going to quit smoking, regardless of what they do.” See other reactions to the tax hike »

Federal taxes also are going up Wednesday on other tobacco products, including cigars. Federal per-cigar taxes, which vary based on weight and price, used to be capped at 4.9 cents but now are capped at 40.26 cents.

The tobacco tax hikes, which President Obama signed into law in February, will be used to finance an expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, or SCHIP. The expansion, which will cost $35 million over five years, is expected to secure federally funded health care for an additional 4 million children.

Before the expansion, SCHIP covered almost 7 million children whose parents earn too much to qualify for Medicaid — the federal health insurance program for the poor — but can’t afford private insurance.

Dave Bowersox, who bought a box of Prime Time Little Cigars at the Denver store Tuesday, said he’s fine with the tobacco tax increases.

“I think tobacco, alcohol, that kind of stuff should be taxed instead of gasoline and food — things that are necessary for people to survive,” Bowersox said.

But near Orlando, Florida, cigar smoker Leah Fuller called the hikes “ridiculous.”

“There are [other] things that you could be targeting in the U.S. right now. Why the tobacco industry?” Fuller said. “I, personally, smoke cigars to relax. Why am I being punished for it?”

Jeff Borysiewicz, founder of Orlando-based Corona Cigar Co., said he believed the federal tax hike will cause cigar sales to drop. And he said the increase comes as Florida is considering a $1-per-cigar state tax hike. iReporters debate whether the change in price is fair »

Cigarettes, too, have been hit by state excise tax increases. Since January 2002, the average state cigarette tax has increased from 43 cents per pack to $1.21 per pack, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

A conservative estimate for the average per-pack cigarette price in the U.S., based on data collected from states and territories at the end of 2008 and adjusted for the federal tax increase, is $4.80, the group’s Eric Lindblom said.

Tobacco company Philip Morris USA raised list prices for its major brands by about 71 cents per pack last month “in direct response to the tax increase,” said Bill Phelps, spokesman for Philip Morris’ parent company, Altria.

RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co. on March 16 raised its cigarettes’ list prices by 41 to 44 cents per pack and, in many cases, reduced discounts to retailers, basically keeping “our pricing in line with the competition,” spokesman David Howard said.

“The federal tax increase was the primary driver,” Howard said.

Both companies said they expect a decrease in sales, with Howard noting industry analysts have estimated a drop of 6 percent to 8 percent. One factor in Philip Morris’ decision to increase list prices beyond the tax hike was the company’s expectation that the new tax level will decrease sales, Phelps said.

Not all U.S. sales declines would be due to smokers quitting, Phelps said.

“Tax increases create an incentive for people to bring cigarettes into the country illegally — [from places] where they don’t have to pay that higher tax,” Phelps said.

Nick Hamad, a tobacco store owner in Seattle, Washington, said he thinks the tax will ruin the American tobacco industry.

“If we lose the sales, the state will lose the revenue,” he said. “We will be hurt, the state will be hurt and eventually the consumers are being hurt.”

As for Jukes, higher prices probably won’t force him to quit smoking, he said.

“I’ve been smoking about 50 years,” Jukes said to which the makers of Smoke Away say, “should anyone have any sympathy for Jukes or other smokers for that matter? The answer is No. And if you want to quit smoking, then a good first step is to contact the makers of Smoke Away on their site or call 1-800-611-5930

The makers of Smoke Away would like to remind you on what happens every time you smoke. If this isn’t as good a reminder as to why you need to quit, we’re not sure what would be.

Being severely obese is as hazardous to health as a lifetime of smoking, shortening life by a decade, a group of Oxford University experts has warned.

Even moderate obesity cuts life expectancy by about three years, says the Clinical Trial Service Unit.

The findings, published in The Lancet, come from data on almost a million people from around the world.

In the UK, a quarter of adults are now considered obese, with a body mass index (BMI) above 30.

BMI is useful for assessing the extent to which fatty tissue causes ill health.

If you are becoming overweight or obese, avoiding further weight gain could well add years to your life
Dr Gary Whitlock of Oxford University

It is calculated by dividing a person’s weight by their height.

Each incremental rise in BMI above the healthy zone of 20-25 increased premature death risk, the Clinical Trial Service Unit concluded.

Much of the obesity-related risk is down to heart disease and stroke, and to a lesser extent cancer.

Amongst middle-aged people in the UK, as many as one in four deaths from heart attack or stroke and one in 16 cancer deaths are due to being overweight or obese, the researchers estimate.

Fat at 40

In adult life, it may be easier to avoid substantial weight gain than to lose that weight once it has been gained, they say.

And avoiding middle age spread could add years to life.

Professor Peter Weissberg of the British Heart Foundation, which supported the work, said: “This is the latest and most convincing demonstration of the close relationship between being overweight and poor heart health, and confirms that smoking is harmful regardless of your weight.

“We all have a role to play in maintaining a healthy weight ourselves, but this study emphasises the importance of public health measures, such as the recently launched Change 4 Life campaign, as part of a raft of Government initiatives that will be needed to reduce the nation’s weight.”

Epidemiologist Dr Gary Whitlock of Oxford University, who led the analysis, said: ”Excess weight shortens human lifespan.

“In countries like Britain and America, weighing a third more than the optimum shortens lifespan by about three years.

“For most people, a third more than the optimum means carrying 20 to 30kg of excess weight. If you are becoming overweight or obese, avoiding further weight gain could well add years to your life.”

Sara Hiom of Cancer Research UK said: “Moderate obesity is becoming worryingly common in the UK and these factors combined are great cause for concern.

“We can eat less and move more to reduce weight. But smoking remains the single most significant cause of cancer death – and stopping smoking works.”

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, president of the UK Faculty of Public Health, said: “Being obese not only shortens life, it also leads to chronic ill-health – diabetes, high blood pressure, gallstones, back and joint troubles. My advice is don’t let it creep up on you.

“Cut down the fat in your food and use every opportunity to be more physical.”

The makers of Smoke Away could not agree more!

As hard as it is to quit smoking, it can be even harder for friends and family that also helping a smoker quit as well. The makers of Smoke Away get this, and for this reason we provide you with 15 tips to help get you and the person trying to quit  through it.

  1. Respect that the quitter is in charge. This is their lifestyle change and their challenge, not yours.
  2. Ask the person whether he or she wants you to call or visit regularly to see how he or she is doing. Let the person know that it’s okay to call you whenever he or she needs to hear encouraging words.
  3. Help the quitter get what she or he needs, such as hard candy to suck on, straws to chew on, and fresh veggies cut up and kept cold in the refrigerator.
  4. Spend time doing things with the quitter to keep his or her mind off smoking — go to the movies, take a walk to get past a craving (what many call a “nicotine fit”), or take a bike ride together.
  5. Try to see it from the smoker’s point of view — a smoker’s habit may feel like a cherished friend that has always been there when times were tough. It’s hard to give that up
  6. Help the quitter with a few chores, some child care, cooking — whatever will help lighten the stress of quitting
  7. Celebrate along the way. Quitting smoking is a BIG DEAL!
  8. Do remind the quitter how long he or she went without a cigarette before the slip.
  9. Do help the quitter remember all the reasons he or she wanted to quit, and forget about the slip as soon as possible  If they have tried and have not succeeded:
  10. Praise him or her for trying to quit, and for whatever length of time (days, weeks, or months) of not smoking.
  11. Encourage him or her to try again. Don’t say, “If you try again…” Say, “When you try again…” Studies show that most people who don’t succeed in quitting are ready to try again in the near future.
  12. Encourage him or her to learn from the attempt. Things a person learns from a failed attempt to quit may help him or her quit for good next time. It takes time and skills to learn to be a non-smoker.
  13. Say, “It’s normal to not succeed the first time you try to quit. Most people understand this, and know that they have to try to quit again. You didn’t smoke for two whole weeks this time. You got through the worst part. Now you know you can do that much. Now that you know you can get through the worst part, you can get even further next time.”
  14. Do smoke outside and always away from the quitter.
  15. Do keep your cigarettes, lighters, and matches out of sight. They might be triggers for your loved one to smoke.

The makers of Smoke Away would like you to see how amazing and how revealing this is, 50 years ago. Addiction isn’t pretty or funny even for Goofy.

In what has to be one of the more stupid things we have seen in quite some time. Yahoo Answers has lost their moral compass in publishing an entry titled:

How do you smoke a cigarette.

Not only is it irresponsible but it is leading others to smoke through this virtual enabling of young smoker wannabe’s. Hey Yahoo, wake up and take this down! The makers of Smoke Away are trying to help, but what are you doing?

yahoo1

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